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veracious
veracious asks:
Q:

Why support common core when those standards present a one size fits all solution, applying the same expectations for highly able and the disabled?

In Topics: School and Academics, National education standards and No Child Left Behind
> 60 days ago

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greenprof2
greenprof2 writes:
Good question. Since No Child Left Behind we have been in a rut of school reform movements characterized by "one size fits all". Educators and researchers such as Diane Ravitch, who initially supported such corporate-backed educational "reforms" have looked at the results after 10 years and have changed their minds, finding that "one size" simply doesn't fit all children, especially those who are not "average" for one reason or another. I've been opposed to corporate-style accountability since they were introduced in the early 1980s but in the U.S., the business community has more influence than those of us in education.
> 60 days ago

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kteacher03
kteacher03 writes:
It all depends on how you look at it.  There is nothing in the Common Core that says that all children need to learn exactly the same way.  It allows for many ways to solve math problems or write a persuasive essay, for example.  A gifted 3rd grader might be able to find several types of patterns in math, while his grade level peer may only be able to understand skip counting patterns or  identify patterns in terms of odd and even numbers.  Yet each child would meet the standard of recognizing patterns in math.   If the gifted child takes highly detailed notes for a research project while the LD student only makes notes on main ideas, both students will would have demonstrated the skill that the standard asks for.  There is a lot more leeway for individualized instruction than there ever was under the standards drawn up to satisfy NCLB -- which, by the way, is really the problem underlying "Waiting for Superman".
31 days ago

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kteacher03
kteacher03 writes:
It all depends on how you look at it.  There is nothing in the Common Core that says that all children need to learn exactly the same way.  It allows for many ways to solve math problems or write a persuasive essay, for example.  A gifted 3rd grader might be able to find several types of patterns in math, while his grade level peer may only be able to understand skip counting patterns or  identify patterns in terms of odd and even numbers.  Yet each child would meet the standard of recognizing patterns in math.   If the gifted child takes highly detailed notes for a research project while the LD student only makes notes on main ideas, both students will would have demonstrated the skill that the standard asks for.  There is a lot more leeway for individualized instruction than there ever was under the standards drawn up to satisfy NCLB -- which, by the way, is really the problem underlying "Waiting for Superman".
31 days ago

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