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Vallee
Vallee asks:
Q:

How do I support my overweight child?

I have 2 daughter, 20 months apart.

The older is extremely atheletic and always on the go. The second participants in sports but not to the same degree. She could take it or leave it.  Either way, I am fine. However, the younger one has an appetite, does not know when to stop eating, is always looking for food and is pretty thick around the middle.

Her body began changing about 3 years ago. She went from a slender - slim sized jeans- kid to plus size. She is aware of the change and not happy about it. But does not seem to know how to curb her appetite.

I have heard many people say - Don't make a weight issue too early. You don't want the negative effects of what can happen. But I am at a loss on what to do with her.

We had a discussion last evening. A younger girl told friends my daughter was Fat. She acted like it didn't bother her, but I know it must have.

Any suggestions or books I can read to deal with this. You only get one shot at raising them and I don't want to miss the boat.

Thanks

In Topics: Self esteem and identity, Exercise and fitness
> 60 days ago

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Edu-Katherine
Edu-Katherine writes:
Jo, it's great that you want to approach this with sensitivity and concern, rather than with judgement and without leaving negative effects. &nbsp;You may want to consider visiting a nutritionist yourself to see what advice you might get. Also, note that sometimes weight changes and eating habits stem from emotional issues and that it may be due to something bothering her.<br />
<br />
You may want to take a look at this article and see if there is some information here that can help you. &nbsp;Hopefully others here in the community will also respond with more information for you.<br />
<br />
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Overweight_Obesity/<br />
<br />
Edu-Katherine<br />
Community Team<br />
> 60 days ago

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kellysfinn
kellysfinn , Parent writes:
Hi Jo,<br />
<br />
I understand your concern about such a sensitive issue. You mentioned that your younger daughter is not as interested in sports as your older daughter. &nbsp;Because fitness is such an important piece in staying healthy, maybe you can get some ideas from our Child Exercise and Fitness articles:<br />
<br />
http://www.education.com/reference/topic/KeepingKidsHealthy_ExerciseAndFitness/<br />
There are articles that recommend fitness activities for every age.<br />
<br />
Hope this helps,<br />
Kelly<br />
> 60 days ago

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Danielle
Danielle , Parent writes:
Hi Jo,<br />
One thing I think is important with young kids is to not deny them everything-- but still have them eating healthy. I've tried a lot of the Recipes for Your Family from Education.com's columnist, Missy Chase Lapine, who used to run Eating Well magazine. She writes something called &quot;Sneaky Chef&quot; and it has all sorts of veggies and fruits and lowfat stuff, hidden in foods kids want to eat (mac and cheese, brownies, etc.) so they can still enjoy those things, but in healthier imposter versions. You might want to check it out :) Her columns are on Fridays, but here's a link to the archives of them:<br />
http://www.education.com/magazine/column/Sneaky_Chef/<br />
> 60 days ago

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jeffreyevers
jeffreyevers writes:
Hello friend, you can easily support your overweight child by providing him martial arts and body building classes.
> 60 days ago

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TeacherandParent
TeacherandP... writes:
It's difficult. On the one hand you want your daughter to be a happy child and feel positive about herself. On the other hand, it's not healthy for a child to be overweight. Overweight children are at risk of developing diabetes at way too young an age. Being made fun of by other children is a small problem when you compare it to the risks to her health that her weight can bring on.
It's more often in what children eat than in the fact that they're not athletic. What does she drink? Water is the only healthy drink. Diet soda has no calories but lots of artificial and chemical sweeteners. Are there crackers and potato chips in the house? Eating a lot is one thing but what you eat a lot of is another thing altogether. If she ate a great many carrots during the day that's very different than eating chips and cupcakes.
Another poster asks if you are concerned about your own weight in any way. Losing weight is one thing - keeping it off is another.
Your daughter is not alone - 1 out of every 3 American children are overweight. 1 our of every 3 American adults are obese. As a country we have a big problem. Visiting a nutritionist as suggested by another poster is a good idea.
> 60 days ago

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