Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
RennieDee
RennieDee asks:
Q:

How can I teach a 22 year old to read and comprehend?

I have recently begun tutoring a 22 year old young woman who, at my best guess reads on a 1st - 2nd grade level.  When she graduated from high school in 2009 (yes, she graduated WITHOUT being able to read) one of her h.s. teachers asked her what she wanted to do next, after graduation; her response was a simple, direct, and heartfelt "I want to learn to read."  Phonics is the system I used to learn to read, as did both of my daughters (15 & 22 and both read at or above college level). The student and I have been working on short and long vowel sounds thus far, and it is apparent that we are dealing with a definite learning disability, though I am no expert by any means and have had no formal training in recognizing and/or identifying learning disabilities.  Repetition, reading together, and simple worksheets have, thus far, been the basis of our sessions. I have been utilizing the web to find skill-appropriate worksheets and teaching aids, which for the most part seems to be showing signs of some success.  Progress is very slow and at times seems to reverse itself, but we keep trying. I try to introduce a consonant or blended sound each week, mainly to attempt to assess where she is at with her ability.  Of Fry's First 100 words, she could "read" approximately 85% of the words; of Fry's Second 100 Words it was more like 20% of the words that she was successful at deciphering. Any tried and true strategies out there that I should be aware of that may help both of us succeed?
In Topics: Helping my child with reading, Learning issues and special needs
> 60 days ago

|

Expert

LouiseSattler
May 17, 2012
Subscribe to Expert

What the Expert Says:

Hello and thank you for writing to JustAsk!

I know that this may seem a bit unorthodox, but you may wish to give her instruction as if she is a second language learner to English. Programs such as Rosetta Stone where reading, aural / oral comprehension and writing are all integrated.

Good luck and thanks for being so involved with this motivated young adult!

Louise Sattler, NCSP

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no

Additional Answers (2)

rmknig
rmknig writes:
Hi I have no expertise in this field but thought I would mention that if you search for BBC skillswise you will find a site by the BBC that is free to access and covers adult literacy and numeracy with worksheets games etc. hope this helps.

It sounds like a diagnosis on any special need/ learning difficulty is essential, could it be dyslexia or something else ?

I have an opinion on a high school that graduates a student and fails to help the student find out what their learning need is, how to help it etc. Are high schools in the area or the country monitored appropriately and improvement programs put in place?
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
2
yes
0
no
MelissaDoesNotBully
MelissaDoes... , Student writes:
She might have dyslexia like me, I’m 13 and in 8th grade. I have a reading disorder and you can look it up too well and also it’s hard for me to read. I love mysteries though and reading books like Stuck in Neutral, a kid with a disorder and other books that have someone with any kind of disorder. My dad found out what helps me was that my dad got me the new Kindle that came out and it helps a lot. I like to listen to someone read and express words rather than me reading a book because I learn with listening and hearing better. Some books on the new Kindle has a person read to you like an actor or the author reads it but most importantly some books do have only computer girl or boy speaking and it sucks so when the new Kindle came out my dad found out that it works better when it expresses the words to me. I prefer to use the new Kindle version and pick the books like Something Rotten is a mystery book and it reads to you so try that one before you go to another book. See how better it is for her.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
1
yes
0
no
Answer this question