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marywood
marywood asks:
Q:

Is it ok for a teacher to take away recess as a punishment?

The teachers at my childrens elementary school punish the students by taking away their recess time.  Is this against the Child no left behind act and where can I get acopy of this?  Also 6th grade does not have recess.  Is this also against the no child left behind act?
In Topics: National education standards and No Child Left Behind, Discipline and behavior challenges
> 60 days ago

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Expert

lkauffman
Jan 11, 2008
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What the Expert Says:

Hi Lisa,

As far as I know, the No Child Left Behind act does not include requirements for recess. In fact, one of the biggest complaints I have heard about No Child Left Behind is that many school districts and schools are cutting down on the amount of time children spend in recess so that they can squeeze in more time for test preparation. Indeed, the U.S. Department of Education has published a report in the last two years indicating that only about 83-88% of elementary schools having daily recess.

Thus, I don't believe that you will get much traction in this area evoking the No Child Left Behind act, but I have heard of parents who have specifically stated to their child's teacher that they want their child to always have access to recess, and if the child needs a consequence, you would rather your child had an extra homework assignment, had to write a letter to the teacher apologizing for the incident, etc. Think creatively, but I'm confident that you can come up with an alternative consequence. I'm interested in hearing other parent's experiences with this, too!

To read the U.S. Department of Education findings on school recess and physical education I had mentioned above, please see the following URL:
http://www.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2006/05/05162006.html

Good luck!

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Additional Answers (3)

Dub12irl
Dub12irl writes:
> 60 days ago

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caramelb2k
caramelb2k writes:
First and foremost a teacher should have a consequence chart that represents class rules and if that be the case then yes she should take recess away from them until they follow class rules. It's the only way students will respect what you are there for and it serves a purpose for them to take with them into the next grade.
> 60 days ago

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JJadvo
JJadvo writes:
It's never ok and the person who said, yes it is, is uneducated about the subject.


January 2011: On My Mind
Play with a Purpose
Why childreen need recess
By Cynthia J. Gentry
http://www.atlantamagazine.com/january2011/playwithapurpose.aspx


A former banker now working with the Atlanta Development Authority was shocked to see his ten-year-old son, an honor-roll student, come home with plummeting grades. “I just don’t like going to school anymore,” the fourth grader confessed. “It makes me so bored. We just sit, read straight from the books, do worksheets, and we never go outside anymore. I get so tired.”
“Boys have to have physical activity,” the father told me. “They’re competitive by nature and need physical competition. School has robbed them of that.”
It’s very important that parents talk to their children everyday about their day at school.  Talk to teachers too.  Ask teachers how long recess is when you attend a conference.  Many schools have cut recess to 15 minutes.  Ask you child if any kids miss recess because they have been bad?  Their answer might surprise you.  Ask them several days in a row and you may see a pattern.


http://www.eduguide.org/library/viewarticle/1512/


By Lisa Hayes and Linda Wacyk
Topics: School Policy and Education Issues, Health and Wellness.

Parents Question Schools' Issues and Policy On Recess
But other parents are stewing about their young children being forced to learn for six hours without a break -- and child development experts agree.
The National Association for the Education of Young Children took a stand as early as 1997 on the value of school recess and outdoor play. They contend that school recess is often the only time during the work week that children are able to be carefree-a time when their bodies, voices and schedules are not under tight control.
Other experts point out that when kids miss out on physical activity and stress-relieving play, they get distracted from learning anyway. When they don't get a break, they lose focus and can't concentrate when it's time to hit the books.


National association for sport and Physical education
Conclusion
NASPE opposes administering or withholding physical activity as a form of punishment and/or behavior management. School administrators, physical education teachers, classroom teachers, coaches, parents and others working with children and young adults play a critical role in providing meaningful physical activity experiences. Therefore, teachers should see providing meaningful physical activity as a way to ensure that children and youths develop positive attitudes about physical activity and stop viewing physical activity as a means of punishment
and/or behavior modification.

http://www.aahperd.org/naspe/standards/upload/Physical-Activity-as-Punishment-to-Board-12-10.pdf


Physical Activity Used as Punishment and/or Behavior Management
> 60 days ago

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