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Bloodymary asks:
Q:

Why would a teacher make a student feel, inadequate when showing this teacher what they had learned on their own?

My grandson received a digital piano a week to ten days ago.  There are 72 keys and all the bells and whistles.  He indicated his desire to learn to play piano, and after he learned the ukulele within a week of receiving it, we decided to invest in a key board.  After 5 days, Aren was playing "Moonlight Sonata" almost all the way through, and only a few missed notes, but, he sounded as if he had been taking lessons for months, except, he never had.  So he went to the piano room to show Ms. Hawkins thinking she would give him an "at ta boy", or tell him to keep it going, anything but what she did say. mind you my grandmother played this piece,and it took her months and months to learn this, yet all he heard was this "teacher" tell him
"use your pedals, use your pedals", and,"slow down you are doing it too fast".  What was she thinking? I don't care, but he about quit because he was so devastated by her remarks.  He had never played piano, let alone being able to play "Moonlight Sonata" in only 5 days-. He is now telling me he will not take a piano course if she is teaching. He is not a whiner, and I will not let him map when things don't go his way, but teachers are there to encourage, and to correct things in a positive manner, not to belittle, or be demeaning.  Thank you. R. Pack grandmother to Aren, and Daniell Vaughn
In Topics: Working with my child's teacher(s), Motivation and achievement at school
> 60 days ago

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Expert

LouiseSattler
Dec 22, 2011
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What the Expert Says:

Hello and thank you for writing to JustAsk!

First KUDOS to your family for recognizing the importance of music education for children and to Aren for being a quick learn.

I am so sorry that he experienced a more "businesslike" response when he shared his enthusiasm and skill with a teacher. However, some teachers are more about the "nuts and bolts" of learning versus the emotional aspects.

Perhaps a private music tutor or other opportunities to shine, such as at family holiday gatherings or senior citizen venues, will give him the encouragement to continue to learn and practice.

Good luck!

Louise Sattler, Psychologist

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