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charitee45
charitee45 asks:
Q:

How can I get teachers to respond to my e-mails?

my son has been getting incomplete report grades and i have e-mailed his teachers to get some kind of understanding as to what ios going on and i have yet to get one reply.  I am terrified because i don't want him to just get by.  He was an honor roll student at his former school.  Please help, i am desperate!
In Topics: Working with my child's teacher(s)
> 60 days ago

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Edu-Katherine
Edu-Katherine writes:
Hi Chelsea,

Have you tried actually setting up an appointment to meet with the teachers face-to-face? This might be easier than waiting for a response via email.

Edu-Katherine
Community Team
> 60 days ago

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JoeBruzzese
JoeBruzzese , Teacher, Parent writes:
Building supportive relationships with your child's teacher(s) becomes more critical as the years pass. If you find that your email messages are not met with a timely response consider leaving a voicemail or stop by the classroom after the school day has come to a close. In either case, keep your initial conversation short and appreciative. Teachers typically hear from parents when there is a problem, rather than when a parent has something appreciative to share. Begin building your relationship with an acknowledgement of the teacher's effort and your willingness to share in the responsibility of guiding your son's academic growth.

As an author (A Parents' Guide to the Middle School Years), former teacher and parent, the emphasis placed on forming a strong relationship with your child's teachers cannot be stressed enough.

Below I have included links to a few of the articles I have written on this topic.

Joe Bruzzese

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Jaded
Jaded writes:
ummm why do you e-mail them?  If they can't have a one on one with you its time you found another school! pronto!!!
> 60 days ago

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SMPTUE
SMPTUE writes:
This is just absurd!  Not you but schools insisting on e-mail communication rather than face to face.

Look, I realize times have changed but there comes a point when we have to say, "Enough is enough!"  Especially in matters of our children's welfare.  

I would go directly to the school and demand to speak to the teacher immediately.  You don't have to be their friend or show them respect because by ignoring your concern thus far they have given neither your son nor you any respect.  

Teachers have the mindset that they are better than parents.  They can teach better than parents, know more about the child than their own parents, understand learning abilities/disabilities better than parents.  I had to deal with just such teachers with my daughter, so I pulled her out and now home school.  She's doing better than the kids who remained being taught by the teachers who told me I was hurting her and could never achieve what they could.

I know that homeschooling is not always an option, but you have some other options.  You can be more active in your child's education by showing up in person and being physically involved rather than technologically involved.  You can have a conference with the principal about the way you and your concerns were blatantly ignored by the teacher, and express your dissatisfaction with the replacement of face - face interaction with e-mail.  You can seek out other schools in your area to send your child to for the next school year.  

One thing I learned while my daughter was still in school is that teachers will do their job more with the students whose parents are watching than the students whose parents are rarely involved.  My brother, a teacher for 18 years, says he sees the same thing and admits it is very easy to let the children with silent parents slip through the cracks.  Teachers are overwhelmed and can only focus on so much, so they rely (whether they admit it or not) on parental input.  

This teacher should be working with you, not ignoring you.  It's high time you went to that school and said something about it.

I understand it is now the end of the school year as you asked this question 2 months ago.  However, you can still speak to the principal about this teacher so it doesn't happen to other kids and so the principal knows you won't tolerate it happening again next school year.
> 60 days ago

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