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ceceteran27
ceceteran27 asks:
Q:

I'm thinking of holding my son back in 6th grade

see my son was in 4th grade and he took a test and then the principle called and said he should be in 5th cause of his age so he went to 5th and graduated barley and then went to 6th and now he has nothing but problems in school.

please help c
In Topics: Helping my child with school work and home work
> 60 days ago

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Expert

lkauffman
Mar 18, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

As you consider grade retention for your son, there are a number of issues to keep in mind. First, you should learn all that you can about research examining the short- and long-term effects of grade retention. The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) has published a position statement (which means that prominent members of the NASP got together, reviewed the evidence, and determined their official "position" on the issue) on grade retention. Overall, the research indicates that students who are held back/retained have worse outcomes academically and emotionally than their peers who were also candidates for retention, but who were promoted. I believe that you should ask his teacher. What does she recommend?

Has your son ever been tested for special eduation? I ask because it sounds like he may have a unique learning style and/or difference that is getting in his way, prohibiting him from accessing the school curriculum. This situation is not particularly unusual as the public school system is designed for the "typical" learner. However, I suspect that your son may need some accommodations or modifications to curriculum, changing the way in which information is being presented to him. However, you and his teachers need to discover what his learning needs are first. I suggest that you get the ball rolling for securing a special education evaluation for your son. There are a number of ways to do this, but you may start by talking with your son's teacher. Express your wish to have him tested, and follow-up with her in order to make certain that the request has been translated to the special education coordinator. Another option is to submit a written request directly to the school principal. Here is a sample letter: http://www.ncld.org/publications-a-more/checklists-worksheets-a-forms/sample-letter-requesting-evaluation. The school must respond with a plan for evaluation or an explanation for why they are choosing not to test. It is in times like this, that you will need to continue to educate yourself on your rights as a parent and dedicate yourself to assuring that school personnel follow through on their responsibilities. For more on navigating special education, please see the following article: http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Questions_Often/

If, and when, your son is found eligible for special education, school personnel will help devise a plan of accommodations (which may include tutoring provided by the school) to support your son. Hope that helps. Good luck and keep us posted!

L. Compian, Ph.D.
Counseling Psychologist
Education.com Expert Panel
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Additional Answers (6)

ronald
ronald writes:
Ceceteran,

Decision to hold your child back is a very difficult one. Not knowing the details makes it difficult to offer an informed opinion. I believe the  best people to decide are the classroom teachers and you the parent. If you are in a middle school with multiple teachers, then you have the benefit of getting feedback from several teachers. You should discuss with all of his teachers the pros and cons of holding your child back. IF your child has a grade level counselor then this person too is a great resource. Pleae read article referenced below.

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LDSolutions
LDSolutions , Child Professional writes:
Remember - it didn't work last year it isn't going to work this year!!!!  My advice to you is to get him tested right away for a possible learning difference.  Then get him the help he needs.  This includes accomodations and modifications in the classroom and remediation that is the right program for him.  He needs to start feeling good about himself.  Holding him back is not going to build his confidence OR give him the skills he needs to move forward.
> 60 days ago

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MrsReading
MrsReading , Child Professional, Teacher, Parent writes:
Hi C,

How does your son feel about all this? He is old enough to weigh in on this decision. Listen to him, he can probably tell you any areas he is weak in or why things went wrong in 5th grade for him. I would not have him retained if he is against the idea. Instead, I would avail myself of tutoring services over the summer to fill in any missing gaps.
> 60 days ago

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mradke
mradke writes:
Also what i have found its not up to you.  We tried to hold our son back in 6th grade.  The Principal refused. There was not much i could do at this point.  It hurts to feel so helpless.
> 60 days ago

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pengwen
pengwen writes:
I say go with your gut.  You have to fight for your son.  You know him best.  I tried several times to hold my son back in elementary school and was urged against it by the administration.  Today he is in 10th grade and still struggles.  I wish I had held him back.
> 60 days ago

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christinasutula
christinasu... writes:
do what u think is best for your son.
> 60 days ago

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