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jenncfgood
jenncfgood asks:
Q:

Do you have tutors who can help children with apraxia, speech delayed problems?

I want to know if you have tutors who may have special education capabilities or extra degree with that kind of help to deal with a child that has a pretty good case of apraxia that has made his learning and remembering difficult. He may have other learning issues that have not been identified. He can learn and made progress but I think he needs to learn in a different way then most children and wondering what you have available in this area of learning problems. Thank you
In Topics: Special needs
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Louiseasl
Jul 2, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

Thank you for writing to education.com and I hope that I can lead you in the right direction to gain assistance for your son.

First, you may wish to talk with the school district to ask for a meeting to discuss your son's current academic progress (Please ask for the meeting in writing and keep a copy of all requests.  Don't forget to place a date on your request).  The school team may suggest a psycho-educational evaluation which should include a test of his cognitive skills (IQ test) and his ability to answer questions age appropriately for academic material (reading, writing, math).  These evaluations can be offered in a way that he does not need to orally respond as adequate non-verbal tests are available.

Second, your son may be in need of using a manual form of communication ( sign language) as a primary or secondary mode.  I have worked with many children with apraxia and often they find sign language an excellent communication system.  It helps to reduce their frustration and increase their ability to get their "point across".  Of course, the use of sign language by your son means that your family needs to also learn to understand sign language as well as his teachers.  If he does  depend on sign language as a form of communication then your school district may provide him with an interpreter in which they will voice whatever he signs to people in the school that don't understand sign language.

Lastly, there are a number of resources online (in addition to www.education.com) that may offer you information, resources and the ability to network with other parents.

http://www.asha.org    This is the national organization for speech and hearing.

http://www.apraxia-kids.org   This website provides not only support and information for parents, but also for kids!

http://www.aslpro.com   To learn on-line basic sign words and phrases.

http://www.ldanatl.org/    This is the national association for learning disabilities to help you with information and resources for children and adults with learning problems.  This site is wonderful for general information about learning differences as well.  (You need not have a documented learning disability to gain worthwhile information here)

Good luck!

Louise Sattler, NCSP
Owner of Signing Families
http://www.SigningFamilies.com

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Additional Answers (2)

ilovechefwilliam
ilovechefwi... , Teacher, Caregiver writes:
Have you talked to your school yet?  This is the place that I would start.  If they can not help, they can at least give you some options of free services available to families in need.  Good Luck!
> 60 days ago

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LDSolutions
LDSolutions , Child Professional writes:
When a child has a learning difference, they need a very specialized reading or tutoring program.  Children with learning disabilities are usually unable to follow the school's curriculum.  They cannot learn using standardized worksheets and workbooks.  

To teach a child with a learning difference how to read, the teacher must begin with the recognition of the letters, the sounds of the letters, and the sounds of letter combinations (phonemes).   This teacher needs to be a specialized and trained teacher in Orton-Gillingham  - or any other program used for students with learning differences.  It must be an extremely structured program that is systematic and cumulative.  This means that, like a pyramid, the base or foundation must first be strong enough to support the entire structure.  With a solid and strong foundation students will be able to recognize words through decoding.  Usually after a student has mastered the decoding process, the fluency and comprehension will follow.  

A specialized and well -trained teacher or tutor of students with learning disabilities will also enhance executive functioning skills, which are often quite weak in students with dyslexia, auditory and visual processing disorder and ADHD.  These students also will need to learn one-on-one with very few distractions in a multisensory, structured learning environment.
> 60 days ago

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