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twinners
twinners asks:
Q:

Why won't our petroleum jelly glow under black light>

In Topics: Science fair
> 60 days ago

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Expert

greenprof2
May 27, 2011
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What the Expert Says:

Petroleum jelly, such as Vaseline, glows bright blue under a black light. Anything you paint with the petroleum jelly will glow blue under ultraviolet light. Petroleum jelly contains substances called phosphors. A phosphor absorbs radiation and emits it as visible light. So the phosphors in the jelly are absorbing the invisible ultraviolet radiation from the black light and emitting visible light. If this isn't working for you, try getting a different brand of petroleum jelly, and/or using a different black light.

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Additional Answers (1)

aqblickley
aqblickley writes:
Hi twinners,

Another community member asked a similar question about getting petroleum jelly to glow under black light. You can read that question and the answers received here: http://www.education.com/question/petroleum-jelly-glow-black-light/

I think you just want to make sure that the light you are using contains enough ultraviolet light, so that the petroleum will absorb the UV frequencies and cause it to glow.

Also, check out the activity in the link below to make sure you're following the directions properly.

I hope this helps!

Alex

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