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raymerruiz
raymerruiz asks:
Q:

does any one know if i can use these worksheets as extra credit in my childs school?

In Topics: School and Academics, My Relationship with my child's school
> 60 days ago

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Expert

BarbK
Sep 28, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

Can you give us some more information?  I'm not sure what worksheets you are referring to, how old your child is, why does your child need extra credit, what does your child's teacher think about this?

I would set up a conference with your child's teacher to determine if extra credit is necessary.  If it is, I would find out why.  Is it because your child doesn't understand the information, just didn't do the work, or forgot to turn it in?  Each of these situations have different problems.

If you can fill in some of the missing information, we can answer your question more completely.

Barb K
www.lessonpop.com

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Additional Answers (2)

raymerruiz
raymerruiz writes:
i meant the worksheets provided in this site, the reason i ask is because my husbands kids fall behind in school sometimes and even if not i would like to keep their brains busy even when not in school.
 
i have my husband findidng out from their teachers so far i have no info but thanks for your help.

thank you!
 raymer
> 60 days ago

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BarbK
BarbK , Teacher writes:
Raymer,

It is nice that you are helping your husband's children.  If you want to give them activities to do at home that will help them in school, that is fantastic.  However, I would try not to use too many worksheets - they get enough of that at school.  Here are a few ideas that will help you keep their minds thinking when they are home.

1.  Go to the public library and check out books.  Get them their own library card as this will make them responsible for taking care of them and returning them on time.  Let them pick out books that interest them even if they look easy.  You want them to practice reading and research indicates that it isn't necessarily the level they are reading, but how much time they are reading.  Kids will read if they find the material interesting.  This is also a good time to introduce different genres.  for example, if one of the children likes dogs, find nonfiction books about different types of dogs or how to train dogs.  Then find a fiction book about dogs.  The librarian is a great resource and usually love to suggest titles.

2.  Roll up your sleeve and volunteer.  Depending on the age of the children, you can volunteer as a family.  This might be at a local food bank or religious organization.  It might also mean helping out a neighbor like raking leaves, planting flowers, walking a dog, etc.

3.  Explore the community.  As you are running around town, point out different people's jobs.  Talk about what they did to get that job and what responsibilities are associated with it.  Also check to see when the public offices are open for tours like the fire & police stations, mayor's office, election office, county court house, etc.  Often they will open their doors and give private tours where the children can ask their own questions.

4.  Whip up something taste to eat.  There is a lot of science and math involved in cooking - just ask Alton Brown from the Food Network.  You can tie in nutrition.  also, if they get good at making one meal, they can repeat it taking the burden off of you!  

As you learn and have fun at the same time, discuss what you are doing, why you are doing it, and how this applies to school and learning.  I believe that kids really want your attention and are usually willing to do anything as long as you to it with them.  

If you need more ideas, please feel free to email directly.

Have fun!
Barb K
www.lessonpop.com
> 60 days ago

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