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Understanding Attachment in Young Children (page 3)

By — North Dakota State University Extension Service
Updated on Feb 29, 2008

Section 2.
Type of Attachment

Think of attachment quality as occurring on a continuum from insecure to secure. Place yourself and your child somewhere on this continuum based on what you understand about attachment types.

Insecure-Resistant/Ambivalent
______________________

                                      ______________________Secure

______________________

Insecure-Avoidant or Disorganized

This is not a scientific evaluation; it is merely a tool to help you think about your own parent-child relationships. Attachment quality may be different for your relationships with different children. Additional examples that you may use are below.

Relationship 1 - ______________________

Insecure-Resistant/Ambivalent
______________________

                                      ______________________Secure

______________________

Insecure-Avoidant or Disorganized

 

Relationship 2 - _________________________

Insecure-Resistant/Ambivalent
______________________

                                       ______________________Secure

______________________

Insecure-Avoidant or Disorganized

 

Relationship 3 - _________________________

Insecure-Resistant/Ambivalent
______________________

                                      ______________________Secure

______________________

Insecure-Avoidant or Disorganized

References

Ainsworth, M.D.S. (1973).  The development of infant-mother attachment. In B. Caldwell and H. Ricciuti (Eds.), Review of Child Development Research (Vol. 3). Chicago, Ill.: University of
Chicago Press.

Bowlby, J. (1982). Attachment and loss: Vol. 1. Attachment (2nd ed.). New York: Basic Books.

Brazelton, T.B. (1992). Touchpoints: Your Child's Emotional and Behavioral Development. Reading, Mass.: Perseus Books.

Bretherton, I. and Waters, E. (1985). Growing Points of Attachment Theory and Research. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 50 (1-2, Serial No. 209).

Gearity, A. (1996). Attachment theory and real life: How to make ideas work. Early Report, Spring 1996. Minneapolis, Minn.: Center for Early Education and Development, University of Minnesota.

Goldberg, S. (2000). Attachment and Development. Hillsdale, N.J.: The Analytic Press.

Marchel, M.A. (1996). Attachment theory: Parent-child relationships revisited. Early Report, Spring 1996. Minneapolis, Minn.: Center for Early Education and Development, University of Minnesota.

Sroufe, L.A. (1985). Attachment classification from the perspective of infant-caregiver relationships and infant temperament. Child Development, 56, 317-325.

Waters, E., Hamilton, C.E. and Weinfield, N.S. (2000). The stability of attachment security from infancy to adolescence and early adulthood: General introduction. Child Development, 71(3),678-683.

For more information on this and other topics, see: www.ag.ndsu.edu   

Publication Date: October, 2005

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