Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus

Teens Online (page 5)

— The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation
Updated on Feb 18, 2011

Differences Between Girls and Boys

  • Studies indicate that boys and girls are equally likely to have gone online: a recent national survey of teens ages 15–17 found that 94% of boys and 95% of girls had gone online.36
  • Teen boys spend slightly more time online than teen girls: among online teens 15–17, boys spend an average of 42 minutes a week more than girls do online (7.6 hours versus 6.9 hours a week).37
  • Teen girls and boys use the Internet for many of the same reasons: similar proportions browse the Web for fun, visit entertainment sites, look for news, visit a chat room, listen to music, check their club or sports team Web sites, visit sites where they can express their opinions, or fi nd information that is hard to talk about with other people.38
  • Playing games online is one of the major gender differences in Internet use. One study found that among teens 12–17, 75% of boys download and play games compared to 57% of girls.39

Impact on Family and Friends

  • Among middle-schoolers and high-schoolers, going online tends to be a solitary activity. Three out of five report going online alone rather than with siblings or peers to explore Web sites (61% versus 21%) or visit chat rooms (61% versus 16%). Few share online activities with a parent for any reason, whether to visit Web sites (6%) or chat rooms (10%).40 • Almost 2 out of 3 (64%) teens express a concern that their Internet use reduces their family time.41
  • Although most online teens are not concerned about the impact of their own use, almost twothirds (62%) think that the Internet keeps others their age from doing more important things.42
  • Most teens (62%) do not think online time detracts from time they spend with friends; in fact, almost half (48%) of those with home access say the Internet strengthens their friendships.43 However, most (67%) say the Internet is not that helpful when trying to make new friends.44

Key Sources

U.S. Department of Commerce, A Nation Online: How Americans Are Expanding Their Use of the Internet. Released: February 2002. Conducted: September 2001. Sample: U.S. Census Bureau's Current Population Survey of 57,000 households across the United States. Relevant fi ndings are among those ages 10–17, with further age breaks of 10-13 and 14-17.

The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Generation Rx.com: How Young People Use the Internet for Health Information. Released: December 2001. Conducted: Fall 2001. Sample: National random dial telephone survey among 1,209 respondents ages 15–24. Statistics in this report are based on respondents ages 15–17 (N=398).

Pew Internet & American Life Project, Teenage Life Online: The Rise of the Instant-Message Generation. Released: June 2001. Conducted: Fall 2000. Sample: Telephone survey of 754 online children ages 12–17 and 754 of their parents or guardians. Sample was selected based on tracking interviews.

The Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania, Media in the Home 2000: The Fifth Annual Survey of Parents and Children. Released: June 2000. Conducted: Spring 2000. Sample: Random dial telephone survey of 1,235 parents of children ages 2–17. Reported for subsamples of children ages 12–17.

The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Kids & Media @ the New Millennium. Released: November 1999. Conducted: Fall 1998/Spring 1999. Sample: Nationally representative sample of 3,155 children ages 2–18, including more than 2,000 written questionnaires completed by children ages 8 and older and more than 1,000 in-home interviews with parents of children ages 2–7. The data are reported for teens 14–18, in addition to the whole sample of children 2–18 years old.

1 U.S. Department of Commerce, A Nation Online: How Americans are Expanding Their Use of the Internet (Washington, D.C.: NTIA and ESA, February 2002), 43, (23 September 2002).

2 Amanda Lenhart, Lee Rainie, and Oliver Lewis, Teenage Life Online: The Rise of the Instant-Message Generation and the InternetÕs Impact on Friendships and Family Relationships (Washington, D.C.: Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2001), 3, 12, (23 September 2002). For the purpose of this fact sheet, this study is referred to as Pew Internet & American Life Project.

3 Kaiser Family Foundation, Generation Rx.com: How Young People Use the Internet for Health Information (Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation, December 2001), 4, (23 September 2002).

4 Pew Internet & American Life Project, 26. Numbers do not add up to 100% because multiple responses were accepted.

5 U.S. Department of Commerce, 46.

6 Kaiser Family Foundation, 4.

7 Pew Internet & American Life Project, 32.

8 U.S. Department of Commerce, 46. Less than 2% of teens go online at locations other than home or school. Studies from the Pew Internet & American Life Project and the Kaiser Family Foundation show similar results. Pew found that one in ten (11%) online teens get their primary or only access to the Internet at school (12%), while KaiserÕs study found that 73% of online 15- to 17-year-olds go online most often from home, 14% most often from school, 7% from a friendÕs house, and 2% from a library (survey dataset).

9 PewÕs study of online 12- to 17-year-olds, conducted in Fall 2000, found that 42% went online every day, while 33% said they went online a few times a week (Pew Internet & American Life Project, 13). KaiserÕs study of teens 15Ð17, conducted in Fall 2001, found that 47% went online at least once a day, 31% went online a few times a week, and 11% went online at least once a week (Kaiser Family Foundation, 15).

10 Emory Woodard, Media in the Home 2000: The Fifth Annual Survey of Parents and Children (Philadelphia, PA: The Annenberg Public Policy Center, 2000), 22, (23 September 2002). For the purpose of this fact sheet, this study is referred to as Annenberg Public Policy Center.

11 Kaiser Family Foundation, survey dataset.

12 U.S. Department of Commerce., 50.

13 Annenberg Public Policy Center, 12Ð13. Low-income families are defi ned as those with annual incomes of less than $30,000 per year, middle-income are between $30,000 and $74,000, and high-income are more than $75,000.

14 U.S. Department of Commerce fi nds that 48% of Black 10- to 17-year-olds do not go online, compared to 52% of Hispanic and 20% of White and Asian American/Pacifi c Islander youth in this age group (50).

15 David Lake, ÒTeens Turn On, Tune In, Log Off,Ó The Industry Standard, 23 July 2001, (23 September 2002). Some of the frequently visited sites include: Teen.com, Teenpeople.com, Katrillon.com, Sparknotes.com, Badassbuddy.com, Blink182.com, Coolquiz.com, Teenmag.com, Teenchat.com.

16 Center for Media Education, TeenSites.com: A Field Guide to the New Digital Landscape (Washington, D.C.: Center for Media Education, 2001), 19, (23 September 2002). It is noted in the report that the results are intended to be an approximation of the distribution of various content, features, and practices and not based on a representative sample of teen Web sites because it is diffi cult to characterize content that is user- centered and ephemeral in nature.

17 Center for Media Education, 58Ð75.

18 U.S. Department of Commerce, 52Ð53.

19 Pew Internet & American Life Project, 35. The fi ndings cited are for online 12- to 17-year-olds.

20 Ibid., 35Ð36.

21 Percentages vary for different age categories across studies. Pew reports 92% of those ages 12Ð17 use e-mail (Pew Internet & American Life Project, 38); Annenberg reports 90% of teens 13Ð17 use e-mail [Joseph Turow and Lilach Nir, The Internet and the Family 2000 (Philadelphia, The Internet and the Family 2000 (Philadelphia, The Internet and the Family 2000 PA: The Annenberg Public Policy Center, 2000), 9, (23 September 2002)]; U.S. Department of Commerce reports 82% of teens 14Ð17 years old and 64% of those ages 10Ð13 use the Internet for e-mail, 53.

22 Pew Internet & American Life Project, 20.

23 Ibid., 3.

24 Ibid., 18.

25 Ibid., 6.

26 Kaiser Family Foundation, survey dataset, 7.

27 Ibid., 8.

28 Ibid.

29 Turow and Nir, 29; The ChildrenÕs Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) requires Web sites to obtain verifi able parental consent before collecting, using, or disclosing any personal information from children under age 13. For more information about the act and compliance, see .

30 Pew Internet & American Life Project, 6.

31 Kaiser Family Foundation, 12.

32 Pew Internet & American Life Project, 33.

33 Kaiser Family Foundation, 13.

34 Ibid., 3.

35 Ibid.

36 Kaiser Family Foundation, survey dataset; Kaiser Family Foundation, Kids & Media @ the New Millennium (Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation, 1999), 50.

37 Ibid.

38 Pew Internet & American Life Project, 38.

39 Ibid., 41.

40 Kaiser Family Foundation, Kids & Media @ the New Millennium, 64.

41 Pew Internet & American Life Project, 28.

42 Ibid., 31.

43 Ibid., 16.

44 Ibid., 17.

View Full Article
Add your own comment