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What Research Says On Parent Involvement in Children's Education (page 2)

— Michigan Department of Education
Updated on Dec 16, 2008

Student Interest

Most students at all levels-elementary, middle, and high school-want their families to be more knowledgeable partners about schooling and are willing to take active roles in assisting communications between home and school.17 When parents come to school regularly, it reinforces the view in the child's mind that school and home are connected and that school is an integral part of the whole family's life.18

School and District Leadership

The strongest and most consistent predictors of parent involvement at school and at home are the specific school programs and teacher practices that encourage parent involvement at school and at home are the specific school programs and teacher practices that encourage parent involvement at school and guide parents in how to help their children at home.19

School initiated activities to help parents change the home environment can have a strong influence on children's school performance.20 Parents need specific information on how to help and what to do.21

 

Federal and State Requirements

Parent involvement components are required in the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), and various federal and state education programs including Early On, Michigan School Readiness Program and Title 1.

Obstacles

School activities to develop and maintain partnerships with families decline with each grade level, and drop dramatically at the transition to middle grades.22 Teachers often think that low-income parents and single parents will not or cannot spend as much time helping their children at home as do middle-class parents with more education and leisure time.23

1Clark, R.M. (1990). Why Disadvantaged Children Succeed. Public Welfare (Spring): 17-23.

2Cotton, K., Wikelund, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Research Series. In Parent Involvement in Education

3Cotton, K., Wikelund, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Research Series. In Parent Involvement in Education

4Rose, Gallup, & Elam, 1997 

5Rose, Gallup, & Elam, 1997 

6Parent Teacher Association 

7Walberg (1984) in his review of 29 studies of school–parent programs

8Cotton, K., Wikelund, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Research Series. In Parent Involvement in Education

9Williams, D.L. & Chavkin, N.F. (1989). Essential elements of strong parent involvement programs. Educational Leadership, 47, 18-20 

10Reynolds, et, al., (6)

11Clark (7:85-105)

121997 Review of Educational Research, a journal of the American Educational Research Association 

13Roberts, 1992. In Online Resources for Parent/Family Involvement. ERIC Digest by Ngeow, Karen Yeok-Hwa, 1999

14Tizard, J.; Schofield, W.N.; & Hewison, J. (1982). Collaboration Between Teachers and Parents in Assisting Children’s Reading

15Sattes (5:2)

16Henderson (1:9)

17Epstein, 1995, p. 703 

18Steinberg (8)

19Dauber and Epstein (11:61)

20Leler, H. (1983) Parent Education and Involvement in Relation to the Schools and to Parents of School-aged Children.

21Morton-Williams, R. “The Survey of Parental Attitude and Circumstances, 1964.”

22Epstein, J.L. (1992) School and Family Partnerships

23Epstein J.L. (1984, March). Single Parents and Schools: The effects of marital status Parent and Teacher Evaluations. Clark, R.M. (1990). Why Disadvantaged Children Succeed. Public Welfare (Spring): 17-23.

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