Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus

Retaking the Exam and Scoring Report for McGraw-Hill's ASVAB (page 2)

By — McGraw-Hill Professional
Updated on Jun 25, 2011

ASVAB Scores and Score Reports

Once you take the ASVAB, the score report you will receive depends on where you took the test. The amount of information you will receive also depends on whether you took the paper-and-pencil version or the computer-adaptive version of the ASVAB.

If You Take the ASVAB at School

If you take the ASVAB at a school, a score report will be sent to your school within 14 days after the test. Your score report will include a number of different scores.

Subtest Scores and Career Exploration Scores

Your score report will include scores for each of the subtests in the test battery. These are General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Auto and Shop Information, and Mechanical Comprehension.

Your score report will also show three Career Exploration Scores: Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills. These are composite scores combining your scores on several ASVAB subtests. The Verbal Skills score includes Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension. The Math Skills score includes Arithmetic Reasoning and Mathematics Knowledge. The Science and Technical Skills score includes General Science, Electronics Information, and Mechanical Comprehension.

The ASVAB Career Exploration Scores are a good indicator of the kinds of tasks that test takers do well and the kinds of tasks that they may find difficult.

Verbal Skills is a general measure of the vocabulary and reading skills covered in the Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension tests. People with high scores tend to do well in tasks that require good vocabulary or reading skills, while people with low scores have more difficulty with such tasks.

Math Skills is a general measure of the mathematics skills covered in the Mathematics Knowledge and Arithmetic Reasoning tests. People with high scores tend to do well in tasks that require knowledge of mathematics, while people with low scores have more difficulty with these kinds of tasks.

Science and Technical Skills is a general measure of science and technical skills, which are covered in the General Science, Electronics Information, and Mechanical Comprehension tests. People with high scores tend to do well in tasks that require scientific thinking or technical skills, while people with low scores have more difficulty with such tasks.

Standard Scores and Percentile Scores

Each of the scores just listed is reported in two ways: as standard scores and as percentile scores. Each standard score is calculated by applying statistical methods to the student's raw score. This method produces a numerical score with a short range of possible statistical error above and below it. Most student ASVAB takers achieve standard scores between 30 and 70. This means that a standard score of 50 is an average score and a score of 60 is an above-average score. The score report shows the numerical standard scores, which are estimates of your true skill level in that area. According to the report, if you took the test again, your new score would probably be similar to, but not necessarily exactly like your initial score.

The percentile scores on the ASVAB score report indicate how well the student did in relation to others in the same grade. For each ASVAB test and composite (called a Career Exploration Score), students receive a same grade/same sex, same grade/opposite sex, and same grade/combined sex percentile score. For example, if you are a female eleventh grader, you would get percentile scores showing how well you did compared to other females in the eleventh grade, males in the eleventh grade, and all eleventh graders. For example, if you scored a percentile of 65 on Math Skills, that means you scored as well as or better than 65 out of 100 eleventh-grade females in Math Skills. When compared to males and all eleventh grade students, your percentile score may be different.

View Full Article
Add your own comment

Washington Virtual Academies

Tuition-free online school for Washington students.

SPONSORED