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Bully-Proofing Playgrounds During School Recess (page 3)

By and — Bullying Special Edition Contributor
Updated on Feb 11, 2009

Tips for Parents and Teachers to Prevent Bullying on the Playground

Based upon this study and several similar investigations, we would recommend the following tips for helping parents and teachers talk with youth about school bullying:

  1. Establish a “go to” or point person at school, such as a teacher or playground supervisor;
  2. Avoid bullying hotspots at school (e.g., less well supervised areas on the playground);
  3. Participate in structured and supervised activities during school-recess;
  4. Make good decisions about which activities or groups of friends to join; and
  5. Inform school personnel if a child is being bullied.

In addition, parents and teachers can help students involved in aggressive conflicts by teaching problem-solving strategies to help children slow down and think through potential conflict situations, by modeling and role playing appropriate ways in which to stay calm in social situations, and by building empathy and perspective-taking skills by asking questions and discussing the child’s school day.

Suggested Further Readings

Leff, S. S. (2007). Bullying and peer victimization at school: Considerations and future directions. School Psychology Review, 36, 406-412.

Leff, S. S., Angelucci, J., Goldstein, A. B., Cardaciotto, L., Paskewich, B., & Grossman, M. (2007). Using a participatory action research model to create a school-based intervention program for relationally aggressive girls: The Friend to Friend Program. In J. Zins, M. Elias, & C. Maher (Eds.), Bullying, Victimization, and Peer Harassment: Handbook of Prevention and Intervention in Peer Harassment, Victimization, and Bullying (199-218). New York. Haworth Press.

Leff, S. S., Power, T. J., & Goldstein, A. (2004). Outcome measures to assess the effectiveness of bullying prevention programs in the schools. In. D. L. Espelage & S. S. Swearer (Eds). Bullying in American Schools: A Social-Ecological Perspective on Prevention and Intervention (269-294). Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Earlbaum Associates.

Loeber, R., Wung, P., Keenan, K., Giroux, B., Stouthamer-Loeber, M., Van Kammen, W. B., & Maughan, B. (1993). Developmental pathways in disruptive child behavior. Development and Psychopathology, 5, 101-132.

Nansel, T. R., Overpeck, M., Pilla, R. S., Ruan, W. J., Simons-Morton, B., & Scheidt, P. (2001). Bullying behaviors among US youth: Prevalence and association with psychological adjustment. Journal of the American Medical Association, 285, 2094-2100.

Nabors, L., Willoughby, J., Leff, S. S., & McMenamin, S. (2001). Promoting inclusion for young children with special needs on playgrounds. Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, 13, 179-190.

References

  1. Nansel, T. R., Overpeck, M., Pilla, R. S., Ruan, W. J., Simons-Morton, B., & Scheidt, P. (2001). Bullying behaviors among US youth: Prevalence and association with psychological adjustment. Journal of the American Medical Association, 285, 2094-2100.
  2. Kazdin, A. E. (1994). Interventions for aggressive and antisocial children. In L. D. Eron, J. H. Gentry, & P. Schegel, (Eds.), Reason to hope: A psychosocial perspective on violence and youth. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  3. Kupersmidt, J. B., Coie, J. D., & Dodge, K. A. (1990). The role of poor peer relationships in the development of disorder. In S. R. Asher & J. D. Coie (Eds.), Peer rejection in childhood. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.
  4. Kochenderfer, B. J., & Ladd, G. W. (1996). Peer victimization: Cause of consequence of school maladjustment. Child Development, 67, 1305-1317.
  5. Olweus, D. (1978). Aggression in the schools. Bullies and whipping boys. Washington, DC: Hemisphere (Wiley).
  6. Loeber, R., Wung, P., Keenan, K., Giroux, B., Stouthamer-Loeber, M., Van Kammen, W. B., & Maughan, B. (1993). Developmental pathways in disruptive child behavior. Development and Psychopathology, 5, 101-132.
  7. Craig, W. M., & Pepler, D. J. (1997). Observations of bullying and victimization in the schoolyard. Canadian Journal of School Psychology, 13, 41-59.
  8. Leff, S. S., Power, T. J., Manz, P. H., Costigan, T. E., & Nabors, L. A. (2001). School-based aggression prevention programs for young children: Current status and implications for violence prevention. School Psychology Review, 30, 344-362.
  9. Leff, S. S., Power, T. J., Costigan, T., & Manz, P. H. (2003). Assessing the climate of the playground and lunchroom: Implications for bullying prevention programming. School Psychology Review, 32, 418-430.
  10. Dowrick, P. W., Power, T. J., Manz, P. H., Ginsburg-Block, M., Leff, S. S., & Kim-Rupnow, S. (2001). Community responsiveness: Examples from under-resourced urban schools. Journal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community, 21, 71-90.
  11. Leff, S. S., Costigan, T., & Power, T. J. (2004). Using participatory research to develop a playground-based prevention program. Journal of School Psychology, 42, 3 – 21.
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