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Teacher Record Keeping (page 2)

By — McGraw-Hill Professional
Updated on Oct 6, 2011

Class Record Charts

When displayed in the classroom, class record charts track similar information for all of your students. They can provide motivation for your students to complete or master the instructional material.

Considerations

  • Use checks, stars, or stickers to indicate completion and/or mastery.
  • Use a slash, X, circle, or empty cell to indicate non-completion and/or no mastery.
  • Create a chart for each subject area and post it on the corresponding bulletin board.
  • Use a variety of colored pens.
  • In upper grades, appoint student monitors to maintain the charts.
  • Cut up completed charts so that individual strips can be sent home for parents to see. 
  • Class record charts can be used to track many different activities, including the following:
    • Completed homework
    • Completion of assignments and/or mastery
    • Mastery of multiplication tables or other specific material

Subject Portfolios

For subject areas such as math, social studies, science, and art, file folders can be set up to create student portfolios.

Considerations

  • Establish guidelines for the subject area portfolios, such as the following:
    • Each portfolio must have three examples of the student’s work.
    • Students select the graded assignments to place in their portfolios.
    • Students must write a note to explain why they selected a specific piece for their portfolio.
    • Students may replace items with improved examples of their work as they see fit.
    • Students must maintain neat and organized portfolios.
  • Use these portfolios to support grade book or grading program records.
  • Remember that portfolios are excellent items to display at Open House or to show to parents at conferences.

Writing Portfolios

Writing portfolios house a collection of students’ writings.

Considerations

  • Establish guidelines for writing portfolios, such as the following:
    • Each writing portfolio must have at least three examples of the student’s work.
    • Students select which graded assignments to place in their writing portfolios.
    • Students may replace items with improved examples of their work as they see fit.
    • Students must maintain neat and organized writing portfolios.
  • Discuss with each student their reason for selecting a particular writing assignment for inclusion in the writing portfolio and record the student’s reason.
  • Use these portfolios to support grade book or grading program records.
  • Remember that portfolios are excellent items to display at Open House or to show to parents at conferences.

Assessment Folders

Assessment folders house a collection of assessments that monitor students' progress.

Considerations

  • Keep all formal assessments in the students' assessment folders.
  • Record assessment scores on the cover of each folder for easy access.
  • Use assessment folders in conferences and during a referral process.
  • Maintain these folders yourself; the contents are confidential.
  • Have assessment folders accessible to administrators for review upon request.
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