Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school with folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more.
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Fourth Grade Reading Practice: Complete the Mystery Fourth Grade Reading Practice: Complete the Mystery This reading worksheet's a good way for 4th graders to boost vocabulary and spelling, and a great tool to get in shape for standardized testing.
Weedy Sea Dragon Facts Weedy Sea Dragon Facts Young readers will love digging into this passage's cool weedy sea dragon facts, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
Dive into the wonderful world of stories with these reading comprehension printables! From fairy tales and fables to story organizers, this collection helps your first grader break down the elements of every story.

Click here to see all of our first grade reading comprehension worksheets.
15 Reading Comprehension Printables for First Grade Dive into the wonderful world of stories with these reading comprehension printables!
Jamestown Colony Jamestown Colony Sail back in time to Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in North America, with this fun, fact-filled worksheet.
Creative Writing: Character Development Creative Writing: Character Development Here's a language arts worksheet that's sure to boost reading comprehension and critical thinking skills.
Julia Child Biography Julia Child Biography Kids who are just starting to read nonfiction can get their feet wet with this easy Julia Child biography that has a quick comprehension exercise at the end.
All About Frankenstein All About Frankenstein This Frankenstein worksheet is great for teaching kids about classic literature near Halloween.
Hard and Soft G Hard and Soft G On this second grade reading worksheet, kids sort initial consonant sounds into two groups: hard "g" as in goose, and soft "g" as in giraffe.
The Butterfly That Stamped The Butterfly That Stamped Help your student with reading comprehension, and enjoy a favorite short story by Rudyard Kipling, about a King, a Queen and two quarreling butterflies.
Interactive Story Writing Interactive Story Writing This reading exercise uses interactive story writing; it's a great way to look at reading comprehension from a different angle.
The Sing Song of Old Man Kangaroo The Sing Song of Old Man Kangaroo Read about why kangaroos hop on two legs, in Rudyard Kipling's "The Sing Song of Old Kangaroo."
Irregular Past-Tense Verbs: Found It! Irregular Past-Tense Verbs: Found It! On this third grade reading and writing worksheet, kids change present-tense verbs to irregular past-tense verbs, then find the verbs in a word search.
Travel Brochure Travel Brochure Explore setting by creating a travel brochure for the setting of your book.
Ada Lovelace Biography Ada Lovelace Biography Kids just starting with nonfiction can read a short biography of Ada Lovelace, and they'll also get practice identifying transition words in text.
Reading for Comprehension: Cause and Effect Reading for Comprehension: Cause and Effect This cause and effect worksheet opens your child up to improved critical thinking abilities.
Story Sequencing: Lunch Time Story Sequencing: Lunch Time This lunch time story is completely out of order!
Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school with folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more.

Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.