Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .
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The Giving Tree Story The Giving Tree Story Think about all the ways we use trees with this comprehension worksheet that explores Shel Silverstein's The Giving Tree.
Reading for Comprehension: Cause and Effect Reading for Comprehension: Cause and Effect Help your third grader improve her critical thinking and close reading skills with this exercise that focuses on story cause and effect.
Pecos Bill! Pecos Bill! Rootin' tootin' cowboys, gather 'round to hear the legendary story of Pecos Bill!
Young readers will love digging into these great passages on their favorite musical instruments, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
Facts About Musical Instruments Young readers will love digging into these great passages on their favorite musical instruments, and they'll get a nice reading comprehension workout in the process.
Hard and Soft G Hard and Soft G On this second grade reading worksheet, kids sort initial consonant sounds into two groups: hard "g," represented by a goose, and soft "g," represented by giraffe.
Julia Child Biography Julia Child Biography Kids who are just starting to read nonfiction can get their feet wet with this easy Julia Child biography that has a quick comprehension exercise at the end.
Disaster Preparedness Disaster Preparedness If the zombie outbreak happens, will you be prepared?
Punctuation: Jack and the Beanstalk Punctuation: Jack and the Beanstalk A written passage without punctuation can be very difficult to read!
Practice Punctuation with the Jungle Book Practice Punctuation with the Jungle Book With this worksheet, your child can practice punctuation, and even get introduced to some classic literature!
Jamestown Colony Jamestown Colony Sail back in time to Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in North America, with this fun, fact-filled worksheet.
Arlen Tells the Truth Arlen Tells the Truth Get to know Arlen in this reading comprehension worksheet,
Fourth Grade Reading Practice: Complete the Mystery Fourth Grade Reading Practice: Complete the Mystery This practice worksheet is great to boost your fourth grader's vocabulary and spelling, and to get to write part of a story using logic and imagination!
Find the Letter D: Hey Diddle Diddle Find the Letter D: Hey Diddle Diddle How many Ds are needed to explain how the dish ran away with the spoon?
John Muir John Muir Meet John Muir, the original environmentalist, in this nonfiction reading sheet.
Sugar and Spice Sugar and Spice Get your third grader in the habit of reading deeper by encouraging him to think about what's going on in this short story and why.
Parts of the Brain Parts of the Brain Why do zombies love brains? Find out with this collection of fun facts and a colorful diagram of the brain.
Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .

Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.

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