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Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is an advanced reader, there are printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school. These reading comprehension worksheets allow your child to get some extra practice in a fun and simple format. Students will read interesting and engaging stories, including folktales, modern stories, and nonfiction, and then learn to discuss, write about, or summarize the story. Have fun and learn with reading comprehension worksheets.

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Meet a pirate from history, Captain Henry Morgan, and get your child's imagination going while blasting boredom out of the water with fun reading and writing.
Comprehension
Third Grade
Meet the mythical Captain Stormalong, a sturdy sailor who's said to have conquered the high seas.
Comprehension
Second Grade
Continue your journey with Kolobok, the crafty little ball of dough. In part three, he encounters a wolf! Can he escape?
Comprehension
First Grade
Some words require more than an S to become plurals. In this worksheet, kids practice using irregular plurals by connecting images to their correct noun.
Comprehension
Second Grade
Can your child tell fact from fiction? Boost reading comprehension with this story sheet featuring a famous tall tale character: Paul Bunyan!
Comprehension
Second Grade
On this second grade reading worksheet, kids sort initial consonant sounds into two groups: hard 'g' as in goose, and soft 'g' as in giraffe.
Comprehension
Second Grade
Does this shark look strange to you? Learn all about why his tail is so long with a fun and informative coloring page!
Comprehension
First Grade
Does your student need punctuation practice? Help her work on grammar and introduce her to some classic literature in the process.
Comprehension
Fourth Grade
Young historians will practice writing essays and get a great reading comprehension workout with this worksheet about the famous Chinese explorer Zheng He.
Comprehension
Fifth Grade
Do you know why hammerhead sharks have such a funny-shaped head? Here's a fun and informational shark coloring page for you and your child to share!
Comprehension
First Grade
Is your child having trouble figuring out his summer reading? Have him write a couple 'slam book' entries from the POV of some of the characters.
Comprehension
Fifth Grade
This sequencing worksheet gets kids to put a story together in chronological order. Use this sequencing worksheet to help tell the story of a girl and her bike.
Comprehension
Fourth Grade
Introduce your little reader to some classic childhood literature, with Rudyard Kipling's charming story 'The Crab That Played with the Sea.'
Comprehension
Fourth Grade
Whether you love the great outdoors or are preparing for the zompocalpyse, this round-up of survival skills will help kids be prepared for any disaster!
Comprehension
Fifth Grade

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Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.


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