Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .
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How to Write Like C.S. Lewis How to Write Like C.S. Lewis Aspiring authors, get inspired by C.S. Lewis and the authors who inspired his fantastical stories!
The Nightingale Story The Nightingale Story Travel back in time to ancient China in this classic Hans Christian Andersen tale, The Nightingale.
The Nightingale Comprehension The Nightingale Comprehension After reading The Nightingale by Hans Christian Andersen, complete this comprehension page to test your understanding of the story.
How to Write Like J.R.R. Tolkien How to Write Like J.R.R. Tolkien For fans of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, here's a great writing composition sheet!
A Christmas Carol A Christmas Carol Enjoy one of the most well-known Christmas stories, "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens.
Black Cats Black Cats Did you ever get bad luck from seeing a black cat cross your path?
Help your child sort fact from opinion with these reading comprehension worksheets.
Fact or Opinion? Help your child sort fact from opinion with these reading comprehension worksheets.
Princess Theater Princess Theater Have some spooky fun with reading comprehension!
Reading Comprehension: Stuffed Elephant Reading Comprehension: Stuffed Elephant Improve your child's reading comprehension, and introduce her to a classic children's story, with this worksheet on The Story of a Stuffed Elephant.
Endangered Species: Black-Footed Ferret Endangered Species: Black-Footed Ferret Get in tune with nature, and read a bit about an endangered species of animal, the Black-footed Ferret.
A Kidnapped Santa Claus A Kidnapped Santa Claus What if Santa Claus got kidnapped? Enjoy this fun Christmas story by L. Frank Baum, the author of Wizard of Oz.
Endangered Species: Forest Owlet Endangered Species: Forest Owlet Teach your child about an endangered species with this information page, all about the Forest Owlet.
The Elves and the Shoemaker: Vocabulary The Elves and the Shoemaker: Vocabulary Test comprehension with this vocabulary page for "The Elves and the Shoemaker" by the Brothers Grimm.
In Russian, the word teremok means 'little hideaway'. Teremok is the main setting in this Russian folk tale. There are five parts to this story series, so get started reading! Your child will get to color the illustrations while she practices reading and builds her vocabulary.
Teremok: Russian Folk Tale In Russian, the word teremok means "little hideaway".
The Elves and the Shoemaker: Story Map The Elves and the Shoemaker: Story Map After reading a Christmas classic, The Elves and the Shoemaker , test your child's comprehension with this story map shoe!
A Christmas Carol: Symbolism A Christmas Carol: Symbolism Introduce your little reader to symbolism with this comprehension page on A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens.
Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .

Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.