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Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is an advanced reader, there are printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school. These reading comprehension worksheets allow your child to get some extra practice in a fun and simple format. Students will read interesting and engaging stories, including folktales, modern stories, and nonfiction, and then learn to discuss, write about, or summarize the story. Have fun and learn with reading comprehension worksheets.

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This quick story of Captain Kidd brings pirates and reading on an adventure for your kids!
Comprehension
Second Grade
Any kid studying the American Revolution will likely have to memorize this famous poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow!
Comprehension
Fifth Grade
Pair the skill of following directions with math and you have a fun way to practice both. Follow the directions to add, subtract or multiply.
Comprehension
Second Grade
Kids practice matching words with their antonyms, a great way to boost reading and vocabulary skills.
Comprehension
First Grade
Help your young time traveler distinguish between the past, present, and future with this reading comprehension worksheet.
Comprehension
Third Grade
Brush up on some simple math while following instructions! Change this string of ten numbers into just one number by following the directions very carefully.
Comprehension
Second Grade
Make following instructions fun and interesting with this worksheet! Your child will practice an important skill that's needed on a daily basis.
Comprehension
First Grade
Following instructions doesn't have to be boring. Start with a phrase. Then rearrange, add and delete words by following the directions very carefully.
Comprehension
First Grade
The legend of Robin Hood was passed down through ballads. After reading about him, you and your child can try writing a ballad of your own!
Comprehension
Fifth Grade
Expand your first grader's vocabulary by learning about synonyms.
Comprehension
First Grade
History is full of heroes, and they can come from all kinds of backgrounds and cultures. For Hanukkah, Rosh Hashanah, or any time of year, meet some famous Jewish-Americans that made their mark in entertainment, literature, science and sports.
Comprehension
Fourth Grade
Travel to the past, present, and future with your child with this comprehension worksheet. Kids will learn about the past, present, and future tenses.
Comprehension
Third Grade
Small or big? Tall or short? Help your child get a grip on contrasting words with these fun worksheets that introduce the concept of opposites.
Comprehension
First Grade
Is your child having trouble navigating the rough waters of reading? Hand her this worksheet about some Olympic events: canoeing and kayaking.
Comprehension
Third Grade

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Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.


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