Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .
Filters
979 Results
Sort by:
Grandpa's Boat Grandpa's Boat What will you be doing on Saturday? Jamie will be on a fishing boat with her grandpa.
Pete's Pets Pete's Pets Read about Pete and all of his pets in this story.
Fun at the Museum of Natural History Fun at the Museum of Natural History Join Joe and Kyla as they explore the Museum of Natural History.
Identify the Author Identify the Author The Jungle Book is a classic story. Find out who wrote it with this worksheet.
History of Photography Timeline History of Photography Timeline Photographs are everywhere these days, but where did they start?
First, Second, Third: An Apple A Day First, Second, Third: An Apple A Day How do delicious apples make it from the tree to the table?
Cinderella's 'Evil' Stepsisters Cinderella's "Evil" Stepsisters This reading response worksheet gives the "evil" stepsisters a chance to defend themselves.
Sleeping Beauty's Prince Sleeping Beauty's Prince Improve your reading comprehension with this exclusive look at the childhood of Sleeping Beauty's prince.
Make a Storyboard Make a Storyboard Is your kid over the moon for stories? Let him use his imagination to make a storyboard of a familiar nursery rhyme.
The Headless Horseman The Headless Horseman Experience The Legend of Sleepy Hollow from two different points of view!
The Sweet Soup The Sweet Soup Help your student's reading comprehension with this short story and clarification questions.
The Ants and the Grasshopper The Ants and the Grasshopper Teach kids that there is a time for play and a time for work with this lesson featuring Aesop's *The Ants and the Grasshopper*.
At the Zoo At the Zoo Bring the zoo to your home with this adjective identification worksheet!
Practice Test: Synonyms and Antonyms Practice Test: Synonyms and Antonyms Build your first grader's vocabulary skills by reviewing synonyms and antonyms together.
Quotation Marks: Say What? Quotation Marks: Say What? The sentences on this third grade reading and writing worksheet all feature a quote from a speaker, but some of the punctuation is missing!
What's up Doc? Medical Vocab What's up Doc? Medical Vocab This worksheet will help your child improve his vocabulary by learning what doctors use to make sick people better.
Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets containing folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more. For more reading resources, check out our full collection of reading worksheets .

Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.