Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school with folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more.
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Frankenstein Frankenstein Get to know the man, the monster,the legend of Frankenstein with this passage from the original novel -- the moment where he realizes he's made a grave mistake.
The Battle of Trenton The Battle of Trenton The Battle of Trenton was a turning point for the Americans in the Revolutionary War.
Jane Eyre Jane Eyre Read this passage from Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, and get both reading and writing practice in one fell swoop.
The Wild Hunt The Wild Hunt Read this version of The Wild Hunt with your little boy or ghoul this Halloween, then answer the comprehension questions at the end.
The Battle of Camden The Battle of Camden The Battle of Camden was a low point for the American forces in the Revolutionary War.
Analogies Worksheet: We're Related! Analogies Worksheet: We're Related! This analogies worksheet helps children compare two unlike things.
St. Patrick's Day Fun Facts St. Patrick's Day Fun Facts Ever wonder why we wear green on St. Patrick's day, or where the leprechaun came from?
Categorize the 2016 Presidential Candidates Categorize the 2016 Presidential Candidates Get ready for the 2016 Presidential election!
Noppera Bo Noppera Bo Ready for Halloween? Here's Noppera Bo, a terrifying folk tale from Japan, to help you celebrate.
History of Valentine's Day History of Valentine's Day The history of Valentine's Day is full of theories about how the holiday began.
The Ghost of Fred Fisher The Ghost of Fred Fisher In this reading worksheet, just in time for Halloween, kids can read all about Fred Fisher, the star of Australia's most famous ghost story.
Shakespeare Biography Shakespeare Biography This Shakespeare biography, written for kids, teaches young readers, writers and thespians all about the literary giant.
Fill-in a Funny Story #5 Fill-in a Funny Story #5 This funny, fill-in-the-blank story lets your first grader get a handle on words, while keeping her entertained.
Story Sequencing: Jacob's Day Story Sequencing: Jacob's Day This reading comprehension exercise combines important pre-reading skills with the fun of drawing.
St. Patrick's Day Traditions St. Patrick's Day Traditions Teach your little leprechaun about the various St.
Hold The Homophone Hold The Homophone Help your child practice words that sound the same but mean different things with this silly mixed-up worksheet.
Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school with folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more.

Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.