Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school with folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more.
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Book Characters Book Characters If your child is writing his first book report, help him get a handle on the characters in his book.
Jack and the Beanstalk: Part 2 Jack and the Beanstalk: Part 2 Fee Fi Fo Fum! Take your young reader on an adventure and build basic comprehension skills while reading the classic fairy tale, "Jack and the Beanstalk."
Notes Page Notes Page When a blank page doesn't quite cut it, here are two blank notes pages that lend a little structure to your thoughts.
Travel Words Travel Words Challenge your child to complete the travel-related words in this match up activity.
Reading Comprehension Practice: Jimmy and the Cake Reading Comprehension Practice: Jimmy and the Cake This worksheet will give your child some important reading comprehension practice that also combines imagination and the fun of drawing!
Louis Braille Louis Braille Those tiny bumps on signs are one of the biggest inventions in modern history.
Sentence Structure: Sentence or Fragment? Sentence Structure: Sentence or Fragment? This second grade reading and writing worksheet about the bookstore has complete sentences and incomplete sentences.
The Main Event The Main Event Every story has a turning point or two, and this worksheet encourages your kid to examine the main event in a book up close.
Fact or Make Believe? Fact or Make Believe? Help your preschooler understand the difference between reality and make believe in this reading comprehension worksheet.
Compare Ghost Stories Compare Ghost Stories In this reading worksheet, students can compare two ghost stories from other sides of the globe and see the ways in which they're eerily similar.
Word Addition: Compound Words 3 Word Addition: Compound Words 3 Kids will make compound words out of two smaller words.
Make a Pair: 2 Make a Pair: 2 Have your preschooler exercise her reasoning skills with this fun-filled work-sheet!
Reading Comprehension: What Do You Think? Reading Comprehension: What Do You Think? Looking for a worksheet that practices reading comprehension?
Which Does Not Belong? Which Does Not Belong? Which does not belong? Ease your child into word families practice with this tricky rhyming sheet.
The Ugly Duckling The Ugly Duckling Read a classic fable with your beginning reader!
Rumpelstiltskin Story Rumpelstiltskin Story How well do you know the Rumpelstiltskin story?
Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is already an advanced reader, we have printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school with folktales, modern stories, nonfiction, and more.

Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.