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Reading Comprehension Worksheets & Printables

Reading comprehension skills are an essential building block for academic success. Whether your child is just beginning to read or is an advanced reader, there are printable reading comprehension worksheets that can supplement what he is learning in school. These reading comprehension worksheets allow your child to get some extra practice in a fun and simple format. Students will read interesting and engaging stories, including folktales, modern stories, and nonfiction, and then learn to discuss, write about, or summarize the story. Have fun and learn with reading comprehension worksheets.

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This worksheet features a spot from the National Register of Historic Places, the boyhood home of Mark Twain.
Comprehension
Middle School
This series of worksheets on famous explorers introduces kids to a handful of important world travelers that they may not even learn about in school! They'll love learning about their accomplishments while they practice their vocabulary, reading comprehension and writing skills.
Comprehension
Fifth Grade
Celebrate Halloween with a spooky reading exercise, where you'll learn all about werewolves! Read up on the history behind these legendary beasts.
Comprehension
Fifth Grade
Kids put their reading comprehension skills to work as they write out the main idea and come up with their own concluding sentence for this paragraph.
Comprehension
Fifth Grade
Story webs organize a story into one main idea and several details. Help your second grader read the story, then analyze it using the story web.
Comprehension
Second Grade
Kids show off their reading comprehension skills with this language arts worksheet.
Comprehension
Fifth Grade
Get educated about the treatment of Native Americans during the creation of the United States. Read about the Trail of Tears, an important landmark.
Comprehension
Middle School
Create a new story using characters from a summer reading or assigned book in this fan fiction worksheet.
Comprehension
Fifth Grade
Enjoy 'How the Whale Got His Throat' by Rudyard Kipling, and complete some reading comprehension activities, including a few coloring pages!
Comprehension
Fourth Grade
Let's make some nonsense! Using 'Jabberwocky' by Lewis Carroll, a poem famous for its otherworldly wacky words, your child makes his own nonsense.
Comprehension
Third Grade
This worksheet will help your child understand what similes are, and she'll even get to use her imagination to write some of her own!
Comprehension
Fifth Grade
Learn an old story about why the sun and moon chase each other around the globe with a fun folktale from the Philippines!
Comprehension
First Grade
Enjoy Rudyard Kipling's story 'The Beginnings of the Armadillos', where your little one will answer questions and enjoy some coloring pages!
Comprehension
Third Grade
Introduce your child to Momotaro, a popular Japanese folktale! Your child will get to make her own story book by coloring the illustrations.
Comprehension
Second Grade

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Improve Reading Comprehension with These Tips

Reading comprehension worksheets are key tools for helping your child understand a book or text. Supplement our reading comprehension worksheets by reading books with your child and doing these simple comprehension exercises:

  • Start with pre-reading engagement. Look at the book cover with your child and make predictions about the subject of the book based on the title and picture. If you're reading "Hansel and Gretel," you might say, "I see that the title of this book is 'Hansel and Gretel.' I also see a boy and a girl on the front cover. I predict that this book will be about Hansel, a boy, and Gretel, a girl." Older children can be prompted to make their own predictions.
  • Ask questions as you read with your child. You can ask your child how you think a character feels based on his picture or words in the text. You might also point out surprising things in the pictures. Kids also love making preditions mid-story; ask your child, "What do you think will happen next?"
  • After you've finished a book, have a short discussion about what you've read. You can ask your child to summarize the story, or tell you his favorite part, or tell you what he thinks will happen to the characters after the book ends.
  • Encourage your child to complete reading comprehension worksheets regularly. There are perfect post-story reading comprehension worksheets, including story maps, 'fan fiction' writing prompts, and comprehension bookmarks. You can also try printing reading comprehension worksheets with stories and exercises together.


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