Probability Worksheets and Printables

Our probability worksheets offer targeted extra practice for kids learning about concepts such as coin probability, probability graphs, and mean, median, mode. These skills are crucial to master in fifth grade before kids move on to higher level math skills in middle school. Browse all of our fifth grade math worksheets for more resources.
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How Many Combinations? How Many Combinations? Sometimes it takes forever to get dressed. There just too many outfits to choose from!
Coin Toss Probability Coin Toss Probability We all know a coin toss gives you a 50% chance of winning, but is it always that way?
Comparing Pictographs: Football Time Comparing Pictographs: Football Time Calling all sports fans and football statistics junkies!
Comparing Pictographs: Tulips and Daisies Comparing Pictographs: Tulips and Daisies Has your child mastered reading single pictographs?
Reading Pictographs: Carrots for Bunnies Reading Pictographs: Carrots for Bunnies How many carrots did Sammy's pet bunny eat?
Comparing Pictographs: Taxi, Taxi Comparing Pictographs: Taxi, Taxi What's better than one pictograph? Two!
Tally Marks: Keep the Count! Tally Marks: Keep the Count! Help your second grader get tally savvy with this worksheet, and next family game night, she can keep score!
What's the Probability? What's the Probability? Probability can get complicated, but this worksheet helps kids understand the concept by keeping the scenarios simple and familiar.
Coordinate Grid: Basic Practice with Sports! Coordinate Grid: Basic Practice with Sports! Introduce your little athlete to grids and coordinates with this worksheet packed with baseballs, volleyballs, soccer balls, and more!
Get into Graphs: Pie Graphs Get into Graphs: Pie Graphs Help your second grader learn how to interpret a pie graph with this worksheet all about kids and their pets.
Make a Venn Diagram: Gift Boxes Make a Venn Diagram: Gift Boxes Once your second grader has a handle on reading them, she can try her hand at making a Venn diagram!
What's the Range? What's the Range? Use this colorful worksheet to teach your fifth grader range.
Build a Bar Graph: Favorite Animals Build a Bar Graph: Favorite Animals What's your child's favorite animal? How about the rest of his pretend class?
Favorite Cities Bar Graph Favorite Cities Bar Graph What's your child's favorite city? Using this pretend survey of 38 people, she'll make her own bar chart that displays their favorite travel destinations in the U.S.A.
Reading Pictographs: Building a New Town Reading Pictographs: Building a New Town Building a new town takes time, not to mention new houses!
Reading Pictographs: Tomato Fest! Reading Pictographs: Tomato Fest! Kids practice reading a simple pictograph to help Mr. Farmer figure out how many tomatoes he picked during his harvest in this math worksheet.
Our probability worksheets offer targeted extra practice for kids learning about concepts such as coin probability, probability graphs, and mean, median, mode. These skills are crucial to master in fifth grade before kids move on to higher level math skills in middle school. Browse all of our fifth grade math worksheets for more resources.

Tips for Teaching Probability

Because probability has lots of real-life applications, it can be a fun math concept to explore with your child. Download and print some of the worksheets above with themes that your child would enjoy. Here are some additional strategies for helping your child develop her probability skills:

  • Start out by explaining to your child that probability helps determine how likely something is to happen. Then, think of an event that would be fun to predict together.
  • For your event determine the number of ways an event can happen and the total number of outcomes. For example, when flipping a coin, it will land on either heads or tails, so there is only 1 "event" that can happen. However there are two possible outcomes. So, the probability of the coin landing on heads is 1/2.
  • Once you have determined the probability of your event, map it out on a probability line with 0 being "impossible" and 10 being "certain".
  • For kids wanting to learn more about how to present data in a visual way, check out our graphing and data worksheets.