Lesson plan

Compare and Contrast Experiences: Reading and Listening to Poetry

In this lesson, students read and then listen to the audio version of a classic poem, Auld Lang Syne. They'll use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast their experience of reading the poem to listening to musical version of the poem.
Grade Subject View aligned standards

Ready to bring music into your reading lesson? In this lesson, students will read and then listen to the audio version of a classic poem, Auld Lang Syne. They'll use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast their experience of reading the poem to listening to musical version of the poem.

Students will be able to compare and contrast the experience of reading a poem to listening to an audio version of the text.

(3 minutes)
  • Display a familiar phrase or jingle from a commercial, such as "Gimme a Break."
  • Invite students to share their initial thoughts and feelings about the phrase. Ask, "What do you visualize when you read that statement?"
  • Play an audio version of the popular phrase or jingle from the commercial, and prompt students to think about how their thoughts and feelings change when they listen to, rather than read, the statement.
  • Ask volunteers to share the difference in their experiences between reading the phrase and listening to the audio version.
  • Share that this lesson will give them the opportunity to compare and contrast the experience of reading a poem to listening to an audio version of the poem.
(8 minutes)
  • Frontload the vocabulary students will use during this lesson. Write the words on the board and provide definitions:
    • experience: something that you have done or that has happened to you
    • audio: sound, especially when recorded
    • perception: the way you think about or understand someone or something
  • Display a copy of the Compare and Contrast Written vs. Audio/Visual Forms of a Text graphic organizer, and review each of the sections.
  • Think aloud about the information you would place in the graphic organizer using the example from the lesson's introduction ("Gimme a Break"). Model using the three key vocabulary words as you think aloud. For example:
    • When I read the phrase, I "saw" someone expressing that they need a relaxing break with peace and quiet, and they were meditating with their eyes closed.
    • When I listened to the audio of the phrase, I "heard" someone energetically expressing that they need a break to be active and move around.
    • My perception was different because the audio version of the phrase was more of a song.
  • Distribute two sticky notes or note cards to each student, and have them label the first as "poem" and the second as "song."
  • Tell the class that they will read a well-known poem written by Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1788 called "Auld Lang Syne." Share that this poem has since been set to music. Explain that students will jot down notes about their experience as they read the poem and then as they listen to the audio version of it. They'll discuss their experience before completing the graphic organizer.
(15 minutes)
  • Display the words of "Auld Lang Syne" by Robert Burns and preview some of the unfamiliar words and phrases. Point out that the phrase "auld lang syne" is repeated throughout the poem, and share that the words mean "old long since" or "days gone by."
  • Instruct students to read the poem to themselves. Invite them to ask for any clarification on word meanings.
  • Give students time to jot notes on their sticky note or note card labeled "poem". They should note their experience, thinking about what they visualize, feel, and hear.
  • Direct students to turn and talk to a partner, before sharing with the whole group, about their notes.
  • Play the audio version of "Auld Lang Syne," and ask students to simply listen to the song before writing down their thoughts.
  • Provide time for students to jot their notes on their sticky note or note card labeled "song." Then, have them turn and talk to a partner.
  • Engage them in a class discussion about their experience listening to the song.
  • Prompt learners to compare and contrast their experiences. Ask questions such as:
    • How does reading the poem compare to the audio version?
    • What did you visualize when you read the poem? What about when you listened to the song? What was similar, and what was different?
    • What did you hear when you read the poem? What did you hear in the audio version of the poem? How was that experience similar or different?
    • Explain the differences between what you see and hear when reading the poem to your perception of what you hear in the audio version.
(15 minutes)
  • Distribute a copy of the Compare and Contrast Written vs. Audio/Visual Forms of a Text worksheet to each individual.
  • Review the sections by having a student explain the information that belongs in each section.
  • Give students time to complete the graphic organizer independently.

Support:

  • Provide sentence starters to support participation in class discussions, such as:
    • When I read the poem, I visualized/heard...
    • When I listened to the audio version of the poem, I visualized/heard...
    • My experience as a reader and listener were the same/different because...
  • Group students in strategic partnerships during the guided practice discussion so that students who need more support can work with more advanced students.

Enrichment:

  • Encourage students to identify another piece of poetry that has been set to music, and to compare and contrast their experience with each version. Invite them to share this example with the class.
(2 minutes)
  • Circulate and observe students as they complete their independent work.
  • Collect the graphic organizer to gauge student understanding from this lesson.
(2 minutes)
  • Review the lesson's objective, and tell the class that this type of exercise is relevant because comparing and contrasting can be done with books and movies, as well.
  • Ask students to turn and talk with a partner to share their answer to the final question on the worksheet: Which version was more enjoyable for you? What made it more enjoyable for you?

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