Lesson Plan:

Double It!: A Lesson on Suffixes and Changing Verb Tense

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December 29, 2016
by Anna Whaley
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December 29, 2016
by Anna Whaley

Learning Objectives

  • Students will be able to change tenses of one syllable words.
  • Students will be able to use the “double the consonant rule" as applied to one syllable words.


Introduction (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to play the “Mix and Match” game. In this game students will be challenged to find a partner that matches their word or suffix and then to say the new word.
  • Distribute one word card to each student.
  • Tell the students that when you say “go” they need to get up and find a student who has a card that can match their card to make a word.
  • Demonstrate as needed.
  • After playing the game, collect the cards and explain to the students that they just made some words that end in -ed. Tell them that they will be learning a new rule for using -ed to read and write in the past tense.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher Modeling (5 minutes)

  • Introduce the process of using double consonants by first telling the students that the rule applies to one syllable words.
  • As needed, demonstrate counting a one syllable word by clapping several words, such as the following words: Clip, drag, and drop.
  • Display the rule using the How to Change Verb Tenses worksheet or by writing it on the board.
  • Model the process of using the rule by making a chart with the following words: Drag, bang, beg, end, clip, and hand.

Guided Practice/Interactive Modeling (5 minutes)

  • Continue the process of guiding students as they decide when to double consonants. Distribute yes/no student response cards, individual whiteboards, and markers.
  • Write "drag" at the bottom of the chart you created during the modeling section.
  • Ask the students to look at the rule and decide if they need to double the consonants before adding “ed.”
  • Ask the students to hold up a “yes” card if the answer is “yes” and a “no” card if the answer is “no.”
  • Check for student responses and discuss as needed.
  • Ask students to write the new word on their whiteboards. Check for accuracy.
  • Continue and repeat the process for the following words: hop, itch, shop, wish, drop, and flap.

Independent Working Time (10 minutes)

  • Distribute the Double It! worksheet and ask students to decide on how to add the correct suffixes and change the verb tenses.




  • Have students brainstorm one syllable words that have not been used and decide if consonants should be doubled.
  • Have the students apply the rule using -ing instead of -ed. Students can use words from the worksheet or words from modeling or guided practice.
  • Extend to using other suffixes, as shown in the “Doubling Rule with Suffixes” video.


  • Provide a short list of examples from the guided practice or independent work time. Write these words on a separate paper and have students play “I Spy” and look for examples of double consonants.
  • Create matching “memory” cards with a correct form of each word on a card. Have the students play “memory” and match several examples.

Technology Integration

  • Use an interactive whiteboard to give students practice identifying double consonants. Ask the students to highlight or circle the double consonants. Double consonants can also be color-coded.
  • Use an interactive whiteboard and have the students sort words based on whether the words have a double consonant.


Assessment (5 minutes)

  • Remove or turn over modeling and guided practice charts.
  • Write several words on the board and have students change the words to past tense and then use them in a sentence. Students can write in their journals or on the back of their worksheets.

Review and Closing (5 minutes)

  • Pair students up and have each pair of students choose an index card with a word written on it.
  • Have the students discuss what they learned and how the word could be changed to past tense.
  • Invite students to share with the whole group.

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