February 15, 2019
|
by Caitlin Hardeman

EL Support Lesson

All About Area

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Finding the Area of a Rectangle lesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Finding the Area of a Rectangle lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to find the area of a rectangle by counting tiles and multiplying.

Language

Students will be able to explain the concept of finding the area of a rectangle using key vocabulary and peer supports.

(2 minutes)
  • Write the word "vocabulary" on the board and ask students to think about why vocabulary is important in math.
  • Instruct them to turn and talk to a partner about their thoughts, and then call on some volunteers to share what they discussed with their partners.
  • Tell the class that they are going to learn about individual vocabulary words and learn about how they all work together to teach about the topic or area.
(5 minutes)
  • Display a copy of the Glossary worksheet on the document camera without showing the definitions or visuals. Read each of the vocabulary words aloud and have students repeat them aloud.
  • Ask students to rate their knowledge of each word by putting up a finger to show how much they know about it. Write the following rating scale on the board for students to reference:
    • 1 - I've never heard of this word and I do not know what it means.
    • 2 - I've heard the word before, but I'm not sure I know what it means.
    • 3 - I've heard the word before, and I understand what it means.
    • 4 - I've heard the word before, and I can explain what it means.
  • Put students into partnerships and prompt them to discuss what they know about each word.
  • Remind students about the objective of the lesson, and how they will work with their peers to learn about vocabulary and how it all works together to explain the concept of finding the area of rectangles.
(15 minutes)
  • Divide the class into four small groups and assign each group to become word experts for one of the vocabulary word. Explain that they will explore the word together as a group to find out the definition. They will create a visual representation of the word, use the word in a sentence, and come up with examples and non-examples of the word.
  • Show an example Frayer Model for the word "geometry" to model how to complete each section of the graphic organizer.
  • Hand out a Frayer Model to each student, and tell them that each student will complete their own graphic organizer with the information they find together as a group. Give groups access to reference materials in order to gather information about their vocabulary word.
  • Scramble the students to create new small groups, with a representative for each vocabulary word in the group. Instruct learners to share and explain their vocabulary word to their group. Encourage group members to ask for clarification as needed.
(10 minutes)
  • Direct students to return to their original groups in which they became word experts together.
  • Invite each group to the front of the room to share their word. While they share, create an anchor chart that puts the pieces together about the concept of finding the area of rectangles.
  • Teach students how to find the area of a rectangle by counting the unit squares, as well as using the strategy in which they multiply the length by the width to find the area. Explain that area is the amount of space inside a shape. Draw a rectangle with the unit squares inside. (e.g., 4 rows of 5 units squares) First, count them and share the answer. Then, show them how to use the length and width to find the area.
  • Give each learner a copy of the Glossary to put in their math journals for reference while they learn more about area in other lessons.

Beginning

  • Allow access to reference materials in home language (L1).
  • Have learners repeat instructions and key vocabulary to the teacher.
  • Provide a word bank of key terms and phrases for students to use in group and class discussions.
  • Group students intentionally based on academic and language needs.

Advanced

  • Allow learners to utilize glossaries and dictionaries for unfamiliar words.
  • Have students describe their math processes without relying on the sentence stems/frames.
  • Choose advanced ELs to share their ideas first in group and class discussions.
  • Put students in mixed ability groups so they can offer explanations and provide feedback to beginning ELs when appropriate.
(2 minutes)
  • Have students write down everything they know about area in their math journals. Challenge them to include words, pictures, and examples in their summary.
  • Provide sentence starters to support students, such as:
    • Area is ____.
    • To find the area of a rectangle ____.
    • The area of a rectangle can be calculated by ____.
    • This picture shows ____.
(6 minutes)
  • Call on volunteers to share what they know about area. Clarify any misconceptions, as necessary.
  • Display an area problem using #1 on the Finding Area with Unit Squares worksheet and share some context about the rectangle to make the problem relevant to students. (e.g., Say, "This rectangle represents a rug that I want to bring into our classroom. But first, I need to know the area of the rug so I can see if it will fit in here! Can you help me find the area of the rug?") Have partners discuss how they would solve the problem. Allow them to use their math journals to jot down any notes or work.
  • Reiterate that the vocabulary words all work together to support an understanding of finding the area of a rectangle. Share that vocabulary is an important part of mathematics because it helps us to better understand the meaning of numbers and operations in a problem.

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