February 22, 2019
|
by Kerry McKee

EL Support Lesson

Circles in a Cup

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Mystery Addends: Representing Word Problems lesson plan.
Grade Subject View aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Mystery Addends: Representing Word Problems lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to identify an unknown addend in an addition problem.

Language

Students will be able to describe strategies to determine an unknown addend in an addition number sentence using manipulatives and partner support.

(5 minutes)
  • Tell students the story problem, "I love bird watching! The other day I saw ten birds in my yard. Four birds were sitting in a tree, and the rest were flying around. How many birds did I see flying around?"
  • Tell students to turn and talk to a partner to describe what is known in the story problem. Choose students to describe what is known: 1) There were ten birds total and 2) Four were sitting in a tree.
  • Choose students to describe different approaches to understand and solve the problem. Some students may approach the problem as an addition problem with an unknown addend. Others may subtract to solve. Validate student thinking and strategies.
  • Sketch the sceanario, first drawing a tree with four birds. Count on to ten as you draw the birds not on the tree, "Five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten." Point to each one as you model solving the problem. Think aloud, "Yes, the picture shows that six birds were flying around."
  • Reflect, "I know that four plus six equals ten, and that ten minus four equals six." Write the two equations under the picture.
(5 minutes)
  • Explain that today students will play a game called “Circles in a Cup.” Say, "I am going to show you ten circles. There are ten circles total, or in all." Tell students to repeat after you, "total", as you display ten circular counters on a document camera (or seat students in a circle to view). Touch each counter as you count chorally to ten.
  • Tell students, "I am now going to hide part, or some, or the circles under the cup." Instruct students to close their eyes, and hide three counters below the cup. Ask students to open their eyes and count how many circles they see outside the cup.
  • Display the sentence frame, “There are ____ circles outside the cup.” Ask students to turn and talk to a partner to say how many circles they counted outside the cup using a complete sentence. Tell students to give you a thumbs up if they counted the same number of circles as their partner.
  • Now, tell students to visualize, or imagine the circles that they cannot see as you point to the cup. Think aloud, “I know that there are ten circles total. I see seven circles outside the cup. I can count on from seven to ten.” Count on, “Eight, nine, ten” keeping track on your fingers. Say, “I think there are three counters under the cup!”
  • Lift the cup, and show students the missing part. Reflect, “I knew that the total was ten, and one part was seven. I know that seven plus three equals ten, so I also know that ten minus seven equals three." Write the equations. 10 - 7 = 3 and 7 + 3 = 10. Say, "Three counters were hiding under the cup!"
(10 minutes)
  • Tell students that they will work with a partner to figure out how many cirlces are hidden under a cup.
  • Display the sentence frames
    • There are ____ circles total.
    • There are ____ circles outside the cup.
    • There are ____ circles under the cup.
    • ____ + ____ = ____, so ____ - ____ = ____.
  • Continue with ten total circles. Instruct students to close their eyes and hide eight circles under the cup. Tell students to open their eyes, and image the missing part.
  • Tell students to turn and talk to a partner to decide how many circles are hidden. Tell them to explain to their partner know they know using the sentence frames. When both partners agree, they should show the number of circles that are hidden on their fingers.
  • Once students have had a minute to discuss, display the hidden circles (two). Ask students to explain how they knew how many counters were hidden. Students will build an understanding of solving for an unknown addend by listening to others explain their thinking.
  • Continue with a few more examples with ten circles total. Allow students time to turn and talk to their partner, and prompt them to justify their answer. Once students demonstrate mastery, change the total number of circles and challenge them to determine the hidden part.
(10 minutes)
  • Tell students that they will now play Circles in a Cup with their partner.
  • Distribute one cup and ten circles to each partnership. Tell partnerships to count their circles to determine that they received exactly ten.
  • Partner A will hide some circles under the cup. Partner B add or subtract to guess how many circles are hidden. Encourage students to connect addition and subtraction using the sentence frame, "____ plus ____ equals ____, so ____ minus ____ equals ____."
  • Partner A will uncover the hidden circles to check whether Partner B was correct. Then, switch roles.

BEGINNING

  • Review the number names in English from one to ten, and display a poster with numerals and number names.
  • Partner students who speak the same home language (L1), and allow them to play the game using L1.
  • Play the game in a teacher-led small group.

ADVANCED

  • Instruct students to explain the steps to find the missing part of a whole in their own words.
  • Challenge students to verbalize how they were able to determine the unknown part using a number sentence or addition strategy.
  • Rotate as students play the game in partners and assess whether students are able to guess the unknown part. Prompt students to explain how they knew how many circles were hidden under the cup.
  • Work with partnerships. Once students are able to identify the number hidden when the total is ten circles, change the total amount of circles. Challenge students to name the unknown part. For example, show them six circles and say, "There are six circles total. Close your eyes. (Hide two circles and leave four visable.) How many circles are hiding?"
  • If students do not correctly identify the missing part, encourage them to explain their thinking. Notice at what point they become confused. Allow students an opportunity to self-correct rather than rushing to provide the correct answer.
(5 minutes)
  • Tell students to give you a thumbs up if they enjoyed playing Circles in a Cup with their partner.
  • Give students the opportunity to reflect on the activity. Display the sentence frame, "I did/did not like playing Circles in a Cup because ____." Tell students to share their opinion, or what they thought, of the game with their partner.
  • As students demonstrate mastery change the total number of circles. Challenge students to play with up to 20 total circles.

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