Lesson Plan

Compare Common Denominators Methods

Challenge your students to compare two methods for finding the least common multiple between two fractions. Use this lesson on its own or as support for the lesson Make It Work! Adding Fractions with Unlike Denominators.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Adding Fractions on Number Lines lesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Adding Fractions on Number Lines lesson plan.

Objectives

Academic

Students will be able to compare two strategies for finding common denominators.

Language

Students will be able to compare two strategies for finding common denominators using language frames and peer supports.

Introduction

(5 minutes)
Two Methods for Finding Common DenominatorsVocabulary Cards: Compare Common Denominators MethodsGlossary: Compare Common Denominators MethodsTeach Background Knowledge TemplateWrite Student-Facing Language Objectives Reference
  • Write the student-friendly language objective on the board and ask a volunteer read it: "I can compare two strategies for finding common denominators using color-coding and peer supports." Have students choral read it again and raise their hand when they hear a vocabulary term they would like to define or have questions about (e.g., least common denominator (LCD), compare, strategies, color-coding, etc.).
  • Ask for volunteers to help you define the vocabulary terms in the language objective and draw visuals to accompany the terms.
  • Gather more background information by asking students to talk to their partners about all the vocabulary terms that they may need to use when discussing the LCD (e.g., denominator, multiple, fractions, etc.).
  • Tell students that today they will compare two strategies for finding common denominators in fractions:
    1. Multiplying the denominators by each other
    2. Finding the least common denominator
  • Distribute the vocabulary cards and define multiples, factor, and denominator. Choose volunteers to restate each of the meaning in their own words. (Tip: choose students who are familiar with the meanings or advanced ELs to restate the meanings first while others do so in their partnerships.)