EL Support Lesson

Counting to 120

Now that your first graders have mastered numbers to 100, extend the counting sequence to 120 with this scaffolded lesson. Use this EL Support Lesson alone, or alongside the lesson plan **120 Steps.**
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the 120 Steps lesson plan.
Grade Subject View aligned standards

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

Which set of standards are you looking for?

This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the 120 Steps lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to represent numbers to between 100-120 using base-ten blocks and written numerals.

Language

Students will be able to describe different ways to represent numbers 100-120 with content-specific vocabulary using pictures and partner support.

(5 minutes)
  • Project the Counting to 120 worksheet on a document camera.
  • Point to the blank spaces at the bottom of the worksheet. Say, "We need to write more numbers here. Does anyone know what number is one more than 100?"
  • Choose students to share the number sequence. Restate, "One hundred one, 102, 103" as you fill in the blank spaces on the chart to 120. Clearly enunciate the number names (do not say one hundred and one).
  • Once you complete the chart, count chorally as a class from 100-120 as you point to the numbers.
(10 minutes)
  • Think aloud, "The numbers 100-120 all look like the other numbers on the chart. Does anyone notice any patterns, or numbers that repeat?"
  • Display the sentence frame, "I notice ____." Tell students to turn and talk to a partner to describe patterns.
  • Invite students to share out what they notice, and list ideas on the board. For example, the same digit is in the ones place in each vertical line of numbers.
  • Highlight the numbers from 1-20 and 100-120. Ask students to share with a partner what is the same about these rows of numbers.
  • Choose student volunteers to share observations with the class. Students should notice that the numbers repeat at one beginning at 101, but that now we need to remember to say 100 before one, two three, etc.
(10 minutes)
  • Project the Place Value Mat: Two-Digit Numbers, and review building a 10 with base-ten blocks by adding 10 ones cubes to the ones column, and then exchanging for a tens rod.
  • Count chorally by multiples of 10 as you add rods to the tens column to build 100. For this lesson, continue to represent the numbers with tens rods and ones cubes. Do not exchange for the hundreds flat.
  • Show students that there are 10 tens in one hundred. Ask students what number you have built if you add a one (101). Write the name "one hundred one" and numeral on the board.
  • Instruct students to join their hands together and raise them. Trace the numeral 101 in the air. Explain the steps as you write the numeral together, "Vertical line straight down, jump, curved line to the left to draw a circle, jump, vertical line straight down."
  • Point out that 101 looks like a plate between two pieces of silverware.
  • Continue to add one ones cubes, write the number name and numeral on the board, and have students write the number in the air.
  • When you reach 110, model exchanging for a tens rod, and continue with 11 tens, adding one at a time to 120.
  • Exchange for a final tens rod to build 120. Recount by multiples of 10 from 10-120, pointing to each tens rod as you count.
(5 minutes)
  • Distribute personal whiteboards and markers to students.
  • Model building a number between 100 and 120 with base-ten blocks. Instruct students to write the numeral on their personal whiteboards.
  • Students can whipser which number they wrote to a partner.

Beginning

  • Work with a teacher-led small group to fill in the numbers from 100-120 on the worksheet. Allow them to reference the numerals and number names as they fill in the chart.
  • If students do not yet know number names in English, instruct them to count in their home language (L1).

Advanced

  • Give students extra practice naming numbers by having them alternate numbers with a partner as they count from 100-120.
  • Seat students in a circle. Say a number and have them count on from that number as they pass an object such as a stuffed animal around a circle. For extra challenge, instruct them to count backwards from a given number.
(5 minutes)
  • Formatively assess further by calling out numbers between 100 and 120, and have students write the numeral on a personal whiteboard. Students may struggle to write numbers greater than 100, especially 101-110.
(5 minutes)
  • Write a sequence of numbers on the board such as 103, 104, 105, ____, 107.
  • Have students read the sequence with you, clapping in place of the missing number.
  • Allow students think time, prompting them with questions such as "What number comes after 105?" or "What number is between 105 and 107?"
  • Chorally reread the number sequence as a class, filling in the missing number.
  • Repeat with a few more number sequences as time allows.

Add to collection

Create new collection

Create new collection

New Collection

0

New Collection>

0 items