February 22, 2019
|
by Kerry McKee

EL Support Lesson

Double-9 Domino Dash

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Adding with Dominoes and Playing Cards lesson plan.
Grade Subject View aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Adding with Dominoes and Playing Cards lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to add two parts to find the whole.

Language

Students will be able to describe the components of an addition number sentence with content-specific vocabulary using visuals and peer support.

(5 minutes)
  • Introduce the lesson by playing "Flash" with Domino Dot Pattern cards. Tell students that you will flash a dot pattern, and then hide the pattern. When you clap, students will call out the number of dots that they saw.
  • Flash a Domino Dot Pattern on the document camera. Display the dot pattern for 2-3 seconds, and then hide the pattern. Clap, and listen as students chorally call out the number of dots.
  • Display the dot pattern again, and let students study the pattern. Encourage students to explain how they "saw" the number. For example, the nine dots pattern has three groups of three, or the seven dot pattern shows two groups of three and one more.
(5 minutes)
  • Next, display a domino on the document camera, for example the domino that shows 5 + 3 = 8. Show students that the domino is divided in half, or two equal parts. Tell students that today they will be adding the dots on either side of the domino. Remind students that addition is the math operation of finding the total of two or more parts.
  • Ask students which math symbol means, "to add." Have students repeat, "plus sign" and they form a plus sign by crossing their arms.
  • Point to the left side of the domino and ask students how many dots they see (five). Point to the right side and ask students how many dots they see (three). Ask students how many total dots there are on the domino (eight).
  • Model writing a number sentence 5 + 3 = 8 to show adding the two parts of the domino to find the whole. Tell students that the parts of the addition number sentence are called addends. Label the addends in the number sentence.
  • Ask students which math symbol means "the same as." Have students repeat "equal sign" as they form an equal sign by holding their arms parallel.
  • Tell students that the sum is the total of two or more numbers. Refering to the example, reflect that the total number of dots is eight. Label "sum" in the addition number sentence.
(10 minutes)
  • Distribute personal whiteboards and dry erase markers to students. Display a domino on the document camera, for example the domino that shows 7 + 8 = 15.
  • Ask students to identify the first addend, or part, and write in on their whiteboards (seven). Tell students to write the math symbol that means "to add" (plus sign). Then, ask them to count the dots on the right half of the domino (eight). Tell students to count the total number of dots, and write the sum after the equal sign (15).
  • Now, flip the domino upside down, and ask students if the domino still shows the same number of dots (yes!). Guide students to write the turn-around fact, 8 + 7 = 15.
  • Tell students to work with a partner. One partner will write an addition number sentence to show the total number of dots on the domino, and the other partner will write a turn-around fact. Show several more examples.
  • Include examples of dominoes that show equal sums with different parts, for example 4 + 3 and 5 + 2. Guide students in realizing that different combinations of dots can be added to equal the same total number of dots.
  • Include examples of dominoes that have zero as one part. Remind students that any number plus zero equals itself.
(15 minutes)
  • Tell students that today they will play a game with their partner, Double-9 Domino Dash. Model playing with a student, and write each step of the game as you play.
    1. Each player chooses a domino.
    2. Each player describe their domino with an addition number sentence, ____ + ____ = _____
    3. The player with the greater, or larger, sum takes both dominoes.
    4. If the sums are equal, each player chooses another domino. The player with the greater sum takes all four dominoes.
    5. The player with the most dominoes wins!
  • Remind students that the dominoes can have different parts, but equal sums. For example, if Partner A chooses 5 + 4 and Partner B chooses 6 + 3, each partner will choose again since the total number of dots is nine on both dominoes.

BEGINNING

  • Review the number names in English from 1-20, and display a poster with numerals and number names.
  • Review the concept of addition using manipulatives and real-world context.
  • Partner students who speak the same home language (L1), and have them play the game together using L1.
  • Play the game in a teacher-led small group.

ADVANCED

  • Instruct students to explain the steps to add two parts to find a whole in their own words.
  • Encourage students to identify which partner will take the dominoes using the sentence frame, "____ is greater than ____, so ____ takes both dominoes."
(3 minutes)
  • Rotate as students play the game to check that each student is saying a number sentence that accurately reflects the dots on the domino. Assess that students know which domino shows a greater number of dots.
  • Ask students questions as they play to assess understanding. Which numbers are the addends, or parts, in the equation? How do they know which player should take the dominoes?
(2 minutes)
  • Allow students time to count the total number of dominoes to determine the winner.
  • Give students the opportunity to reflect on the activity. Display the sentence frame, "I did/did not like playing Double-9 Domino Dash because ____." Tell students to share their opinion of the game with their partner.
  • Move the materials for the game to a center, and allow students further opportunities to practice addition by playing Double-9 Domino Dash with a small group.

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