Lesson Plan

Inferences and Introductory Phrases

In this lesson, students are asked to cite the text for evidence as they make an inference in a nonfiction text. It can be taught on its own or used as a pre-lesson to Inferences in Nonfiction Texts: Cesar Chavez and Farmworker Rights.
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Inferences in Nonfiction Texts: Cesar Chavez and Farmworker Rights lesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Inferences in Nonfiction Texts: Cesar Chavez and Farmworker Rights lesson plan.

Objectives

Academic

Students will be able to make inferences with evidence from a text on Cesar Chavez.

Language

Students will be able to cite the text with introductory phrases when inferring using a graphic organizer.

Introduction

(5 minutes)
Teach Background Knowledge TemplateWrite Student-Facing Language Objectives ReferenceIntroductory Phrases in InferencesVocabulary Cards: Inferences and Introductory PhrasesGlossary: Inferences and Introductory PhrasesCite the Text: Introductory Phrases
  • Write the word "evidence" in the middle of a piece of chart paper. Ask students to consider the term evidence and talk to a partner about what they think the word means.
  • Invite them to share their responses and write them down around the word on the chart paper. Affirm their ideas and background knowledge before reading the student-friendly definition of evidence. Elaborate that when readers interact or make meaning of a text, it is important to provide evidence that supports their thinking.
  • Tell students that today they will learn how to cite the text as evidence when making inferences with the help of introductory phrases.