EL Support Lesson

Magic 2D Shapes

In this mini-lesson, your ELs will learn all about 2D shapes using hands on practice! This can be used as a stand-alone or support lesson for the Shape It Up lesson plan.
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Shape Up: Identifying Shapes lesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Shape Up: Identifying Shapes lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to identify 2D shapes and use accurate terms to describe them.

Language

Students will be able to describe 2D shapes that they have created using sentence frames and visual supports.

(2 minutes)
  • Gather the class together.
  • Hold up your string and tell students that this is a magic string, and that it is going to help them learn about something new in math today, shapes!
  • Ask students, "What is a shape?" Then have them turn and talk to a partner to share their thinking using the sentence frame: "I think a shape is ____."
  • Explain that a shape is the outline of something and that today you will be learning about 2D or flat shapes.
(5 minutes)
  • Gather your string into a ball and then demonstrate turning your string into a flat circle (e.g., on a table, you could project using a document camera as able).
  • Explain that this shape is called a circle, then have students repeat "circle" back to you.
  • Display the circle vocabulary card to the class.
  • Define the circle, explaining it is a shape that is round and doesn't have sides or corners.
  • Repeat this process with a square, triangle, and rectangle.
  • Have students turn and talk to a partner, sharing something they learned about ones of the shapes.
(10 minutes)
  • Pass out a string to each student (while they continue to sit in a group) and demonstrate turning your string into a circle one more time.
  • Have students copy this process using their own strings.
  • Ask students to turn and talk to share with a partner how they know it is a circle, "I know my shape is a circle because____."
  • Take note of student conversations and capture their thinking using sticky notes or writing directly on chart paper.
  • Refer back to the shape cards as needed.
  • Repeat this same process with the triangle, rectangle, and square shapes.
(10 minutes)
  • Display the first two pages of the shape books and demonstrate how to use the materials to create the first two pages in the book.
  • Pass out the first two pages of the shape book to each student for them to complete independently at their desk or table.
  • As students are working, circulate around the classroom and engage students in discussion of where they see shapes in the classroom and how they know which shape is which. Continue to capture student thinking and ideas to add to your chart.

Beginning

  • Work with a smaller group on the shape book and have students practice making each shape with their string before putting it in their mini book
  • Have students share where they see other similar shapes using the sentence frame, "I (insert shape) ____. I know they are (shape name) because (insert characteristics, e.g., round, four sides, three corners, etc.)."

Advanced

  • Have students identify additional 2D shapes in the classroom. Provide sentence starters for students to use when identifying and describing their shapes, "I see a (insert shape). It is/has ____ (insert characteristics, e.g., round, four sides, three corners, etc.)."
  • Ask students to record the shapes they find by drawing pictures and then sharing with a peer.
(5 minutes)
  • Ask students to share which shapes they made with their string, listen for their justification of which shape they made. Can students accurately describe the shape characterisitics?
  • Collect work samples and assess if students were able to match the shapes correctly.
(3 minutes)
  • Gather the class back together and ask students to turn and talk to share their favorite shape with a peer, using the sentence frame: "My favorite shape is a ____ because____."
  • Close the lesson by saying something like, "Shapes are all around us! Can you look around the classroom and see any of the shapes we worked with today?"

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