March 2, 2019
|
by Jasmine Gibson

EL Support Lesson

Making Categories

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Categorize It! lesson plan.
Grade Subject View aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Categorize It! lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to sort and categorize objects based on their characteristics.

Language

Students will be able to explain how to sort objects based on their attributes using tactile supports.

(3 minutes)
  • Display the collected items to the class and ask them to share with a partner what the objects have in common, or how they might be the same using the sentence starter: "The objects are the same because __ __ __ __."
  • Have pairs share out with the class (possible answers might be: same kind of toy, similar shape, similar color, etc).
  • Repeat, this time asking students to share with a partner how the objects might be different using the sentence starter: "The objects are different because __ __ __ __."
  • Have pairs share out with the class.
  • As students share, record student ideas and thoughts on the chart paper to track learning goals and student process.
(2 minutes)
  • Explain that today you will be practicing how to categorize, or sort objects by how they are the same or different.
  • Tell students that we sort things to put them in special groups. Provide examples of times when it would make sense to sort something into categories (e.g., putting away toys, organizing books, looking for things at the grocery store, et cetera).
  • Using the objects from the previous section, model how to categorize them by color/shape/size by thinking aloud, e.g., "I am putting all of the big cars together over here." "I am putting all of the red cars over here."
(5 minutes)
  • Display the What Belongs in the Kitchen? worksheet and have students give a thumbs up or thumbs down as you point to each object to decide if it belongs in the kitchen.
  • Explain that now you will pair students together and pass out 3–4 objects to each pair. One partner will put the objects into two groups, then the other partner will try to guess what the groups are. Model how to play this game using a student volunteer as your partner.
  • Pair students together and pass out materials.
  • Gather the class back together and have several groups share out the categories they chose.
(15 minutes)
  • Display the Cut and Categorize 1 worksheet and explain that now students will get to practice sorting the pictures into food and animal categories.
  • Review any materials expectations and demonstrate how to cut and paste the pictures on the worksheet.
  • Pass out materials for students to work independently.

Beginning

  • Provide additional vocabulary support by passing out the vocabulary cards for students to use.
  • Have students work with a partner to complete the Cut and Categorize 1 worksheet.
  • Provide students with additional sentence frames, such as, "I think this belongs __ __ __ __ because __ __ __ __." to help them explain their thinking.
  • Provide a word bank with corresponding visuals with adjectives to describe objects ("big," "red," "small," etc.).

Advanced

  • Have students create additional categories using the objects. Encourage the students to share how they chose the categories with a peer or teacher.
(3 minutes)
  • Circulate around the room and assess if students are able to form realistic categories and are able to explain the category to a peer.
  • Collect student work samples and assess if students were able to correctly sort the objects. Pay special attention to common areas of confusion (different vs. the same).
(2 minutes)
  • Gather the class back together and play a quick game of Which of These Things Doesn't Belong? By displaying three items that go together and one that doesn't. Have the students guess which doesn't belong and practice explaining why to a peer.

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