February 22, 2019
|
by April Brown

EL Support Lesson

Money Values

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Base-Ten Money: Hundreds, Tens, and Ones lesson plan.
Grade Subject View aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Base-Ten Money: Hundreds, Tens, and Ones lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to recognize different bills and identify their values.

Language

Students will be able to explain their thinking with content-specific vocabulary using sentence frames and visuals for support.

(5 minutes)
  • Project the images of the different types of bills on the whiteboard (dollar bill, five dollar bill, ten dollar bill, twenty dollar bill, and hundred dollar bill).
  • Ask students to turn and talk to a partner, explaining what the items are used for.
  • Allow a few students to share out. Record their ideas on the whiteboard.
  • Explain to the students that the items are money and they are all types of bills. Bills, unlike coins, are made from paper. We use these different types of bills to pay for the things we need and want, as well as to pay people for their work.
  • Call student volunteers up to the front of the classroom and ask the following questions:
    • Can you point to the bill that is worth the most?
    • Can you point to the bill that is worth the least?
    • Can you point to the bill that you've used before to purchase something?
  • Give students the pointer to use to encourage participation.
  • Explain to the students that today they will learn about the different types of bills and their values.
(10 minutes)
  • Put the students into partnerships and give each pair a copy of the Vocabulary Cards. Project the Vocabulary Cards on the whiteboard and read the student-friendly definitions, referring to the visuals for support.
  • Refer to the images of the real bills that correspond with the bills on the vocabulary cards (dollar bill, five dollar bill, ten dollar bill, twenty dollar bill, fifty dollar bill, hundred dollar bill).
  • Point to the dollar bill and instruct students to turn and talk to their partners, sharing the name of the bill and the value orally. Encourage students to refer to their vocabulary words for support. Write sentence stems/frames on the board to support students in sharing out. Examples include:
    • That is a ____ (name of bill) and it is worth ____ (value).
  • Continue this process for each of the different bills.
  • Guide students in writing the numerical value of the bill above the written word in each bill's definition.
(10 minutes)
  • Project the image of the couch on the whiteboard and write down the following story problem next to the image:
    • Suyki's mom bought a new couch. The couch cost five hundred dollars ($500). Suyki's mom had 2 ten dollar bills, 2 twenty dollar bills, and 5 hundred dollar bills. What bills should she use to pay for the couch? Why?
  • Put students into partnerships and ask them to get out their math journals. Pass out the play money to each partnership. On the board, write:
    • The ____ costs ____.
    • Suyki's mom could use ____ to pay for the couch.
  • Have students copy the sentence frames into their math journals. Next, ask students to display the play money on their desks so each bill is visible to you.
  • Discuss the values of each bill as a whole group and encourage students to refer to their vocabulary cards for support throughout the lesson. Write $500 on the board. Say, "I know Suyki needs five hundred dollars. Each ten dollar bill is worth ten dollars. If I take one of the ten dollar bills and combine (or add it) with the other ten dollar bill, how much money do I have?"
  • Encourage students to use their math journals to sketch their answers and reinforce that we would add these two numbers together because we are combining them and want to figure out the total amount.
  • Allow students to share their ideas with a partner, and then share out to the class. Elaborate that when we add ten dollars to ten dollars it equals twenty dollars. Write 10 + 10 = 20 on the whiteboard. Ask students to stand up if they think that's enough money to pay for the couch or stay seated if they think it's not enough money to pay for the couch. Provide a sentence frame to support students in sharing out their answer, for example:
    • "Twenty dollars ____ (is/is not) enough money because ____."
  • Explain to the students that you want them to work together to explore different combinations of the bills to figure out what bills they can use to pay for the couch (it should equal $500).
  • Model strategies such as skip counting, addition, or using a hundreds chart to support student understanding as necessary/appropriate. Instruct students to draw strategies used in their math journals.
  • Have students share out the accurate combination using the following sentence frame:
    • "Suyki's mom could pay with ____ because it is equal to ____."
  • Clarify any misconceptions and explain that she should pay with the five hundred dollar bills.
(10 minutes)
  • Project the image of the bicycle on the whiteboard. Explain to the students that the bicycle costs $100.
  • Have students create a new problem in their math journals, using one of their names or a name that is famliar to them as the character in the story problem. Write the following sentence frame on the board and read it aloud to support students in creating their story problems:
    • ____ wanted a bicycle. The bicycle costs one hundred dollars ($100). ____ could use ____ ten dollar bills, ____ twenty dollar bills, and ____ hundred dollar bill to pay for the bicycle.
  • Explain to the students that next, each partnership must try to figure out what bills to use (referring to their play money, vocabulary cards, and math journals) to purchase the bicycle.
  • Give students sufficient time to solve the problem. Rotate around the classroom, observing students as they work collaboratively. Ask prompting questions to support student discussion and reflection.
  • Ask students to stand up with their math journals and switch math journals with another pair of students. The purpose is for students to compare solutions and methods used to solve the problem. Write question stems on the board for students to discuss with their partner as they review the coins used to pay for the doughnut:
    • Are the bills the same or different from the bills you used?
    • Do the bills, when combined, or added, equal one hundred dollars ($100)? How do you know?
    • Do you have any questions about this partnership's strategy?
  • Allow a few students to share out their answers and elaborate on the correct way to create one hundred dollars ($100), while clarifying any confusion around bill names and values.

Beginning

  • Invite students to bring in money from their country of origin. Encourage the students to share their money with the class.
  • Provide the definitions of vocabulary words in English and student's home language (L1), if possible.
  • Give student a partially filled out chart with bill names and illustrations on the left and bill values on the right.
  • Have students work in a small, teacher-led group during group work with other students who need support.
  • Allow student to respond to the value of the bills using numbers instead of words during the closing activity.

Advanced

  • Encourage students to create a bulletin board featuring different types of money from all over the world, including labels that explain the name and the value.
  • Ask students to share their reasoning without referring to the sentence stems or frames for support.
  • Have students explain definitions of vocabulary words such as money and value in their own words.
  • Rotate around the classroom and observe students during group work. Jot down notes, illustrations, and language used as students collaborate and solve the problems.
  • Collect student journals and review them as a formative assessment.
(3 minutes)
  • Gather students together in a group and do a Whip-Around-Pass.
  • Pull out bills and go around in a circle, instructing students to orally share the bill's name and its value using a sentence frame:
    • "That is a ____ (name of bill) and it is worth ____ (value)."

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