February 24, 2019
|
by April Brown

EL Support Lesson

Multiples of 10

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Big Spenders lesson plan.
Grade Subject View aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Big Spenders lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to add and subtract 10 from multiples of 10.

Language

Students will be able to critique a flawed response in relation to adding and subtracting multiples of 10 with academic vocabulary using discussion cards and partnerships for support.

(8 minutes)
  • Gather the students together in a comfortable area.
  • Pass out personal whiteboards and markers to each student.
  • Write 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100 on the whiteboard.
  • Next to the numbers, write the following question and sentence frame:
    • How many more is 20 than 10? (20 is ____ more than 10.)
  • Ask a student volunteer to read the question and sentence frame aloud.
  • Encourage students to turn and talk to an elbow partner to figure out the answer. Instruct each student to record their answer on their personal whiteboard.
  • Allow a few students to share out their answers. Explain to the students that all of the numbers written on the whiteboard are multiples of 10. Elaborate that this means that 10 combined with 10 equals 20, 10 combined with 10 combined with 10 equals 30, and so on. Write down 10 + 10 = 20, 10 + 10 + 10 = 30, etc., to support student understanding. Clarify that 20 is 10 more than 10.
  • Project the Hundreds Chart on the whiteboard and circle the multiples of 10 in the far right column on the chart. Explain to the students that a hundreds chart is one of the tools that can be used to add and subtract multiples of 10. Continue by explaining that some students may also use mental math to add and subtract multiples of 10 if they feel very comfortable with multiples of 10. Clarify that mental math is when you figure out the problem in your head, without using other tools.
  • Get out base-ten blocks and show students ten groups of ten (the long rectangles). Count by 10 up to 100 using the base-ten blocks, and explain that base-ten blocks are another tool that can be used to add and subtract multiples of 10.
  • Instruct students to put on their "mathematician hats" because they are going to use their knowledge of multiples of 10 to figure out if you solved a problem correctly today!
(8 minutes)
  • Tell the students that before you get to the activity, you want them to understand some important vocabulary words.
  • Review the Vocabulary Cards with students, explicitly defining the words using the student-friendly definitions. Refer to the visual representations to support student understanding.
  • Clarify any confusion about the vocabulary words, especially the mathematical concepts of integer and multiple. Provide real-world context and examples when necessary. Next, allow students a few minutes to explain the definitions in their own words to elbow partners.
  • Provide sentence frames to support students in sharing their ideas, for example:
    • The word ____ means ____.
    • An example of ____ is ____.
  • Allow a few partnerships to share their ideas with the class and jot down any key words, phrases, sentences, or visuals they use to refer back to throughout the lesson.
(10 minutes)
  • Put students in partnerships and pass out copies of the Hundreds Chart to each student, along with base-ten blocks (ten groups of ten to equal one hundred). Provide students with access to whiteboards and whiteboard markers as well.
  • Create a word bank on the whiteboard with the following number names and corresponding base-ten numbers next to each number name (ten-10, twenty-20, thirty-30, fifty-50, sixty-60, eighty-80, ninety-90, one hundred-100). Read the number names in the word bank and encourage students to utilize the word bank to read the sentences throughout the lesson.
  • Write the following sentences on the whiteboard:
    • Fifty is ten more than thirty.
    • Fifty people will be at Mila's birthday party.
  • Explain to the students that your friend, Mila, is having a birthday party. Mila invited thirty friends, and then ten family members decided they were going to come, too. Mila wants to figure out how many people are going to be at the party in all.
  • Give students a minute to turn and talk to a partner, explaining what the problem is asking. Ask students to think about if they need to add or subtract. Allow a student to share out their reasoning, and encourage them to use their vocabulary cards to justify their answer.
  • Read the sentences aloud: "Fifty is ten more than thirty. Fifty people will be at Mila's birthday party."
  • Say, "In your partnerships, I want you to discuss whether or not I'm right about fifty being ten more than thirty. You are going to critique my work. Turn and talk to a partner, explaining what the word critique means (give wait time). Use the sentence frames on the board to help you as you discuss your answer with your partner."
  • Write and orally share sentence stems and frames such as:
    • I agree that fifty is ten more than thirty because ____.
    • I disagree that fifty is ten more than thirty because ____. The answer should be ____ instead. I think this because ____.
  • Rotate around the room and observe student work and discussions.
  • Allow pairs to share out their ideas and allow a few students to record their solutions on the board with connecting visuals, words, and sentences. Encourage students to explain the tools they used to figure out the problem (mental math, base-ten blocks, hundreds chart).
(10 minutes)
  • Provide students with another problem that needs to be solved, but this time make sure the operation used is subtraction (e.g. I had one hundred dollars but I gave ten dollars to my brother. How much money do I have left?) Have students identify the operation that needs to be used and encourage them to use the vocabulary cards to justify their reasoning. Encourage students to paraphrase what the problem is asking them to find prior to working in their partnerships.
  • Write two incorrect sentences on the whiteboard that relate to the problem, such as:
    • Eighty is ten less than one hundred.
    • I have eighty dollars.
  • Explain to the students that they will figure out if the sentences are right or wrong and explain their reasoning. Reinforce that they will be critiquing your work again.
  • Write and orally share sentence frames such as:
    • I agree that eighty is ten less than one hundred because ____.
    • I disagree that eighty is ten less than one hundred because ____. The answer should be ____ instead. I think this because ____.
  • Rotate around the room and observe student work and discussions.
  • Allow pairs to share out their ideas and allow a few students to record their solutions on the board with connecting visuals, words, and sentences. Encourage students to explain the tools they used to figure out the problem (mental math, base-ten blocks, hundreds chart).

Beginning

  • Provide students with access to a bilingual dictionary with corresponding visuals.
  • Give students a partially filled out copy of the Glossary prior to the lesson with words in English and their home language (L1).
  • Research a video that demonstrates counting by 10's in the student's home language and play it for the class (if possible).
  • Allow students to share their closing remarks in their home language (L1).

Advanced

  • Encourage students to explain their ideas and thoughts throughout the lesson without referring to the sentence stems/frames for support.
  • Ask students to explain what mental math means to the class in their own words.
  • Challenge students to think of one or two different types of mathematical problems they can solve using mental math, hundreds charts, and base-ten blocks.
  • Rotate around and assess student understanding during group work.
  • Jot down your observations and refer to them as a formative assessment.
(4 minutes)
  • Bring students together as a whole group. Write the following sentence supports on the board and have students share their ideas with a partner:
    • A multiple of 10 is ____. I know this because ____.
    • A strategy I can use to add/subtract multiples of 10 is ____ (hundreds chart, mental math, base-ten blocks).
    • I'm still wondering about ____.
  • Close the lesson by explaining that being able to fluently add and subtract multiples of 10 will help them become better mathematicians.

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