May 24, 2019
|
by Jasmine Gibson

EL Support Lesson

Race Car Counting

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Mystery Numbers lesson plan.
Grade Subject
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Mystery Numbers lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to order numbers from zero to 20 from least to greatest.

Language

Students will be able to describe the relationship between numbers using content-specific vocabulary and visual supports.

(2 minutes)
  • Gather the class together for the start of the lesson.
  • Display Race Car Count by Rebecca Kai Dotlich and ask students to raise their hands if they have ever seen or heard of a race car.
  • Explain that today we are going to be practicing our counting skills with race cars!
(10 minutes)
  • Read aloud the book, as you read point out the order of the numbers and how they match the number of cars on each page.
(10 minutes)
  • Read aloud the book, as you read point out the order of the numbers and how they match the number of cars on each page.
  • Have students turn and talk to share with a partner answers to the question, "What would happen if I started counting the cars and started at nine?" Allow students a few minutes to share and then say, "Right! I would get all mixed up because I want to start at the smallest number and count in order."
  • Point to the number posted and model counting aloud from 0-20.
  • Use the Vocabulary Cards and Glossary to introduce and review order, greatest, and least.
  • Model counting aloud in a mixed-up order and see if students notice what you are doing. If not, say, "Whoops! That doesn't sound right! Let me try again." Remind students that when we count, we always count in the same order from 0-20.
(5 minutes)
  • Explain that today the class is going to practice making a race track and racing their cars from 0-20.
  • Model how to use one of the strips of tape and placing the number cards in order on the tape from 0-20 (make at least two mistakes in the order of the numbers).
  • Ask the class to help make sure you put the numbers in order.
  • Point to the cards as you count them aloud, pausing to see if the students notice your mistake.
  • Invite students give a thumbs up or down to indicate if each of the individual numbers are ordered correctly as you count them a second time.
  • Fix the order of the cards with student input and by referring to the number line for guidance.
  • Demonstrate how two students will race their cars from 0-20, counting aloud as they race.
(10 minutes)
  • Explain that now students will get to practice ordering their very own race track!
  • Tell students that before taping down their number cards, they will ask their partner to make sure they are ordered from least to greatest. Once both students have a completed the race track, they will get to take turns racing cars and counting aloud on both tracks.
  • Pass out materials (tape, number cards, toy car) and send students to work.

Beginning

  • Allow students to count in their home language (L1).
  • Put students in groups of two to complete a shared race track.

Advanced

  • Ask students to extend their race track by adding in numbers greater than 20.
  • Ask students to explain to their partner how they know their race track is ordered correctly.
(5 minutes)
  • Circulate around the room and assess if students are able to accurately order their race tracks from 0-20.
  • Take pictures of student work and write down student quotes to capture learning. Post this to document student growth and areas of learning.
(3 minutes)
  • Gather the class back together.
  • Ask students to share out different strategies they used to order the numbers on their race tracks.
  • Practice counting aloud as a group or play a counting song to close the lesson.
  • Celebrate the success of the class by saying something like, "You worked so hard to number your race tracks in order! We order numbers to help us know what comes next."

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