Lesson Plan

Signal Words, Facts, and Opinions

Use this lesson to help your ELs search for signal words in texts to determine if a statement is a fact or an opinion. It can be a stand-alone lesson or used as support for the Is It True? lesson.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Is It True? lesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Is It True? lesson plan.

Objectives

Academic

Students will be able to differentiate between statements of fact and opinion within nonfiction texts.

Language

Students will be able to differentiate between fact and opinion statements with specific vocabulary using word banks and strategic partnering.

Introduction

(3 minutes)
Graphic Organizer Template: Frayer ModelTeach Background Knowledge TemplateWrite Student-Facing Language Objectives ReferenceSentence Sort: Fact or Opinion?Seahorse Search: Signal Words, Facts, and OpinionsVocabulary Cards: Signal Words, Facts, and OpinionsGlossary: Signal Words, Facts, and Opinions
  • Write this sentence frame on the board: "I think ________ is the best movie because ________." Call on a volunteer to fill in the blanks.
  • Explain to students that this sentence is an example of an opinion, which is a statement or belief that says what someone thinks or feels.
  • Call on a second volunteer to fill in the blanks and tell students that these two students have different opinions about what they believe is the best movie.
  • Write this sentence frame on the board: "There are ________ students in our class today." Call on a volunteer to fill in the blank.
  • Explain to students that this sentence is an example of a fact, which is a statement that can be proven to be true.
  • Tell students that today they will be reading texts and determining if they are facts or opinions.