Lesson Plan

Think About What Went Wrong!

Use this lesson to help students build their speaking and listening skills as they learn how to critique a flawed response using discussion cards. Use this as a stand-alone support lesson or alongside the activity Break it Down!
Download lesson plan
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Break It Down lesson plan.
Grade
Subject
View aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Break It Down lesson plan.

Objectives

Academic

Students will be able to subtract three-digit numbers.

Language

Students will be able to critique a flawed response with academic vocabulary using discussion cards and partnerships for support.

Introduction

(5 minutes)
Vocabulary Cards: Think About What Went WrongGlossary: Think About What Went WrongInquiry Math Discussion CardsTeach Background Knowledge TemplateWrite Student-Facing Language Objectives Reference
  • Have students sit down in a circle on the floor. Explain to the students that you have a very important problem to solve and you need their help! Elaborate that one of your friends (e.g. Sasha, Jake, etc.) owns an apple farm (change the type of farm and fruit/vegetable to make it relevant to students where you live).
  • Tell the students that Sasha harvested 356 apples, but unfortunately, 124 of the apples rotted before she could sell them! Say, "Now Sasha is trying to figure out how many apples she can sell. Do any of you have an idea about how Sasha can figure out how many apples she can sell? Can I figure this out by adding or subtracting?"
  • Give students time to do a think-pair-share. Provide sentence stems and frames to support students in their discussions.
  • Gain students' attention and ask a few partnerships to share their ideas.
  • Clarify that you should use subtraction because Sasha wants to take an amount away from a given quantity.
  • Write 356 – 124 = ________ on the whiteboard. Solve the problem using the standard algorithm, asking students to help you as you detail the process using sequencing words (e.g. first, next, then, finally).
  • Explain to the students that today they will learn how to identify whether they should add or subtract by thinking about what the story problem is asking and discussing their ideas with their peers.
  • Activate prior knowledge by asking students to turn and talk to a partner, explaining what addition and subtraction mean. Provide sentence stems, such as:
    • Addition means you ________.
    • Subtraction means you ________.