February 24, 2019
|
by April Brown

EL Support Lesson

Understanding Line Plots

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Line Plots: Representing the Length of Classroom Items lesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Line Plots: Representing the Length of Classroom Items lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to use a line plot to represent data.

Language

Students will be able to describe the characteristics of a line plot with grade-level academic vocabulary and represent data using line plots and sentence frames.

(4 minutes)
  • Gather students so they are sitting near the whiteboad. Project the Comparing Sets of Data worksheet on the whiteboard. Say, "Can anyone tell me what these are?" Have students turn and talk first with an elbow partner and then allow a few students to share out their ideas with the rest of the group. Ideas may include graphs, pictures, types of sports, etc.
  • Ask students if the graphs are the same or different. Have students turn and talk to a partner and then ask a few students to share out their ideas with the rest of the class. Encourage students to explain their thinking by offering prompting questions, such as:
    • Why do you think the graphs are the same?
    • Why do you think the graphs are different?
  • Encourage students to come up to the whiteboard to show similarities and differences between the graphs. Provide sentence stems and frames for students who need extra support during the discussion.
  • Clarify that each graph represents, or shows, a set of data. Point to the graph on the right and say, "Can anyone tell me what type of graph is here on the right?" Allow a student to share their idea and elaborate that the graph is a bar graph. If the student was able to label the graph accurately, ask the student to explain how they knew the graph was a bar graph. Point to the graph on the left and say, "This is a line plot. We are going to learn about line plots today and how to represent data using a line plot."
(8 minutes)
  • Put students in partnerships and ask them to go back to their seats. Ask students to get out their math journals.
  • Keep the Comparing Sets of Data worksheet on the whiteboard and pass out the Vocabulary Cards worksheet to each student.
  • Read through the student-friendly definitions, referring to the visuals on the vocabulary cards to support student understanding.
  • Explain to the students that all of the vocabulary cards are words that can help them understand a line plot.
  • Refer to the Comparing Sets of Data worksheet and say, "Who can come up to the whiteboard and point to the line plot?" Encourage the student to explain why they think it is a line plot. Provide sentence frames and stems as necessary.
  • Ask the rest of the class to turn and talk to a partner, sharing if they agree or disagree with the student. Provide a sentence frame to support student discussion:
    • I agree that ____ (student's name) is pointing to the line plot because ____.
    • I disagree that ____ (student's name) is pointing to the line plot because ____.
  • Continue the same process, asking students to come up to the board to point to each part of the line plot (title, x-axis, scale, data) and explain their reasoning orally. Prompt students to turn and talk to their partners throughout the activity, explaining why they agree or disagree with each student's examples.
  • Ask the students to copy the line plot in their math journals and label each part of the line plot, using their vocabulary cards and partners for support.
(10 minutes)
  • Explain to the students that next, they will be creating a line plot with their bodies!
  • Clear a large space in the classroom. Get out masking tape and mark a line on the floor of the classroom. Place the pieces of construction paper labeled with numbers 0–5 on the number line, spaced an equal distance apart. When they are where you want them, tape them in place.
  • Pass out sticky notes and markers to each student. Say, "I want you to think about how many siblings you have in your family, not including yourself. For example, I have one brother. So I am going to write '1' on my sticky note." Show the students the sticky note.
  • Ask students to explain the directions to an elbow partner in their own words. Next, give students time to write the number on their sticky note. By groups, ask children to stand on the location above the number in a line. Ask students to double check the number they wrote on their sticky note to make sure they didn't write the wrong number or make a mistake.
  • Ask students to leave their sticky note at the number where they are standing (vertically) and sit down. Organize the sticky notes so they are arranged appropriately.
  • Have students step back and look at the line plot. Ask students to turn and talk to a partner, sharing what they notice:
    • I notice that ____ children have ____ siblings.
  • Take a picture of the line plot with a camera.
(10 minutes)
  • Ask students to go back to their seats and project the photograph of the line plot on the board.
  • Ask students to copy down the line plot on their own paper, using x's to represent the sticky notes. Provide an example for students if needed.
  • Have students answer the following questions in their math journals. Provide sentence frames to help students write their answers.
    • Which number of siblings do most students have? Most students have ____ sibling(s).
    • Which number of siblings do the least students have? The least number of siblings is ____.
    • What information can't we find from looking at this graph? We can't find out how many ____ (toys, cars, etc.) each student has.

Beginning

  • Provide students with a partially completed Glossary to refer to throughout the lesson.
  • Define same and different using visuals and words in English and student's home language prior to the lesson.
  • Allow students to work in a small, teacher-led group during group work and assessment.
  • Provide a sentence frame to support students in sharing out during closing remarks.

Advanced

  • Encourage students to explain their reasoning without referring to sentence frames or stems for support.
  • Have students explain the vocabulary words in their own words to a partner.
  • Ask students to use sequencing words as they explain the directions during the guided activity.
(3 minutes)
  • Rotate around the room as students are copying down the line plots and answering the questions in their math journals. Listen to student conversations and assess student's ability to partake in dialogue. Ask yourself which students are struggling to collaborate and write down any speaking and listening skills that would benefit them in the future.
  • Ask students to label the parts of the line plot and collect student journals when everyone is finished. Use student work as a formative assessment to gauge if the lesson's objectives were met and plan for future lessons on line plots.
(5 minutes)
  • Have students stand in a circle. Have each student share an answer to the following sentence stem:
    • One thing I learned today was ____.

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