August 9, 2015
|
by Rhondra Lewis
Lesson Plan:

Onomatopoeia Practice

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Students will understand the concept of onomatopeia and be able to use them in writing.

(5 minutes)
  • Have students complete the Comic Book Onomatopoeias worksheet.
  • Ask students what they saw as they worked through the sheet.
  • Tell students that onomatopoeias are popular in comic books and graphic novels because they are words that sound like what they describe.
  • Explain to students that in this lesson, they will use onomatopoeias in various texts.
(10 minutes)
  • Read aloud the directions for the A Crash Course in Onomatopoeia and then look at the first example: "phone."
  • Have students discuss what the onomatopoeia for this image might be.
  • Remind students that onomatopoeia is a word that imitates its sound.
  • Students should answer, "ring."
  • Go through a few more of the examples and allow students to come up with the onomatopoeia for each image.
(10 minutes)
  • Have students work in pairs to complete the Onomatopoeia worksheet.
  • Students will follow the directions on the sheet and use a word bank to complete the assignment.
(25 minutes)
  • Have students work independently to create a short story about a visit to a farm or the zoo using the words found on the Animal Onomatopoeia worksheet.
  • Tell students that they must use at least 10 of the onomatopoeias in the word bank.
  • Enrichment: Allow advanced students to create a mini-comic using onomatopoeias during Independent Working Time. They can view the How to Fold a Mini Comic video to learn how to make the book.
  • Support: Allow struggling students to complete the Animal Onomatopoeias worksheet and discuss which animals make the sounds.
(5 minutes)
  • Hand out the sticky notes.
  • Have each student write the definition of onomatopoeia and five examples of onomatopoeia on his sticky note.
  • Give students five minutes to complete this assignment.
  • Use the notes as an informal assessment tool.
(5 minutes)
  • Have students explain in their own words what they learned today.
  • Allow students to ask questions that they still have about onomatopoeia.

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