August 14, 2017
|
by Byron Delcomb

Lesson plan

Picture Walk: A Preview

no ratings yet
Download lesson plan
Grade
Standards

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

Which set of standards are you looking for?

Students will be able to preview texts by noting predictions, questions, and main ideas with graphic organizers.

(10 minutes)
  • Write, number, and display the following sentence starters to your class:
      1. I predict...
      1. I think the main idea is...
      1. I wonder why…
  • Explain to your class that you are going to pantomime (perform silently without speaking) a picture walk. A picture walk is a preview technique when you page through a text without reading it, just looking at the pictures, asking questions, and making observations and predictions.
  • Tell your students to silently hold up fingers (up to three) for sentence starters of their choice if it applies during your pantomime picture walk. You won’t be speaking, so it’s up to them to raise quiet hands to stop you! Students may share out when called on.
  • Act out the preview, slowly showing and turning pages towards the class as you look to the audience. As students watch, they will silently raise a hand with one, two, or three fingers held high to be selected to comment.
  • Lead your class through the activity, allowing students to share their predictions, main ideas, and questions through the text’s end.
  • Explain to your students how useful thoughts and predictions could be if they could compare them after reading the story!
  • Share the lesson objective: Note predictions, main ideas, and questions on a graphic organizer while previewing text.
(5 minutes)
  • Display the Picture Walk Preview Notes activity to your students.
  • Demonstrate a picture walk to your class, slowly flipping through and displaying the text while thinking aloud. Note predictions, main ideas, and questions on the activity sheet.
  • Answer any clarifying questions when finished.
(10 minutes)
  • Handout double sided copies of the Picture Walk Preview Notes activity to your students. Select a student to pantomime a picture walk as demonstrated in the lesson opener.
  • Trade places with the student-as-teacher and provide them with a text selection. Share the following protocols:
    • Quiet students will be called on to make comments.
    • The class will have time to write the comment on the Picture Walk Preview Notes activity.
    • The picture walk will resume for preview and comments.
    • Begin the activity.
  • Reflect with your students on the guided practice session, allowing feedback from the student-as-teacher and answer any clarifying questions.
(10 minutes)
  • Hand out text selections for students in pairs.
  • Instruct students to flip their worksheets and take turns performing a picture walk while their partner makes predictions, cites main ideas, and notes questions on their Picture Walk Preview Notes activity.

Support:

  • Offer leveled and differentiated nonfiction texts for student analysis.
  • Use nonfiction picture books in picture walk demonstrations for their large page design, strong illustrations, and detailed photographs.

Enrichment:

  • Have students complete the Picture Walk Reflections worksheet.
  • Overhead and document projectors can enhance a presentation as this lesson includes a pantomime presentation requiring keen audience observation and interaction.
(5 minutes)
  • Post a nonfiction text in four different places around the room with a blank poster paper, labeled stations 1, 2, 3, and 4.
  • Assign students to a station by having them count off 1 through 4 to add their name, prediction, main idea, or question about the text.
  • Review posters for student understanding.
(10 minutes)
  • DISCUSS: What perspectives, voices, and representations are missing from nonfiction texts reviewed in the lesson?

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely

What could we do to improve Education.com?

Please note: Use the Contact Us link at the bottom of our website for account-specific questions or issues.

What would make you love Education.com?

What is your favorite part about Education.com?