December 17, 2017
|
by Mia Perez
Lesson Plan:

Reading Limerick Poems for St. Patrick's Day

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Grade

Students will be able to identify and describe limericks.

(5 minutes)
  • Tell students that March is a special month because it is a time when people all over the world celebrate the culture of Ireland with a holiday called St. Patrick's Day.
  • Ask students to share what they know about St. Patrick's Day.
  • Explain to students that we will celebrate St. Patrick's Day today by reading limericks. Tell students that a limerick is a silly and humorous poem. The word limerick comes from Limerick, Ireland, which is where limericks originated.
(10 minutes)
  • Project the Limerick Fun worksheet onto the board, and cover all of the text except for the limerick.
  • Tell students that this is an example of a limerick written by Edward Lear—an author and poet who popularized limericks.
  • Read the limerick aloud, and ask students to follow along with you.
  • Ask students what observations they can make about this limerick. How many lines are there? Do any of the lines rhyme? What do they notice about the rhythm (or beat) of this poem? Write students' observations on a piece of chart paper titled "Limericks."
  • Support students to see that limerick poems have the following characteristics:
    • The poem contains five lines.
    • The first, second, and fifth lines rhyme (write an "A" next to each of these lines).
    • The third and fourth lines rhyme (write a "B" next to each of these lines).
    • The first, second, and fifth lines must have seven to ten syllables.
    • The third and fourth lines must have five to seven syllables.
(10 minutes)
  • Project the Write Your Own Limerick worksheet onto the board, and cover all of the text except for the two limericks at the top of the paper.
  • Direct students' attention to the first limerick poem about a fellow named Perkins.
  • Read the limerick aloud, and ask students to follow along with you.
  • Call students to the board to identify the characteristics of this limerick poem. Encourage students to use the "Limericks" poster as a resource.
  • Have a student volunteer underline the trio of words that rhyme.
  • Call on another student volunteer to circle the pair of words that rhyme.
  • Ask for more student volunteers to count the number of syllables in each line and write that next to each line.
  • Continue this practice with the second limerick about a person named Mose.
(15 minutes)
  • Hand out and preview the Limerick Syllables worksheet for students to complete independently.
  • Tell students that, in addition to writing the number of syllables in each line, they are to underline the three words that rhyme with one another and circle the two words that rhyme with each other in each limerick.
  • Encourage students to use the "Limericks" poster as a resource and to have fun reading these silly poems.

Support: Read aloud each limerick for students having difficulty with reading, and ask them to give you a thumbs up when they hear rhyming words. Reread each limerick so that they can also count the syllables in each line.

Enrichment: Challenge students to follow the limerick rules to write their own humorous limerick.

(5 minutes)
  • Write two sample poems on the board. For example, write a haiku and a limerick poem.
  • Read both poems aloud, and ask students to describe what is the same and what is different about these two poems. Ask students to identify the limerick poem and explain why it is the limerick poem.
  • Continue this process of comparing a limerick poem with other types of poems. For example, compare acrostic poems and shape poems.
(10 minutes)
  • Project the Write Your Own Limerick worksheet onto the board, and cover the two limerick poems at the top.
  • Tell students that we are going to write our own limerick poem as a class.
  • Explain to students that we are going to fill in the blanks with the words and/or phrases in the green box.
  • Call on student volunteers to select words or phrases from the box.
  • Continue this process so that your class has written at least three new limerick poems. Challenge students to also use their own words and/or phrases to fill in the blanks.

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