October 2, 2017
|
by Mia Perez

Lesson plan

Sight Word Extravaganza

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Students will be able to read and spell the sight words introduced in this lesson.

(5 minutes)
  • Tell students that today they will be getting a new set of sight words.
  • Remind students that sight words are commonly used words that are important for students to memorize by sight.
  • Explain to students that they encounter sight words as they are reading all types of books, magazines, newspapers, etc.
  • Ask students to brainstorm a list of sight words as a class that they have encountered during their reading and/or learned in the past. Write students’ contributions on chart paper.
(10 minutes)
  • Take your set of sight word cards and hold up the first sight word card.
  • Read the word aloud to your class and ask students to repeat it to you.
  • Model for students how to clap the spelling of the word by producing one clap for each letter read aloud.
  • Repeat this activity until all sight words have been read and spelled aloud.
  • Optional: Alternate the ways in which students spell the word. In addition to clapping the spelling, students could stomp, snap, or whisper the spelling of each sight words.
  • Stick all of the sight word cards onto a piece of chart paper and post onto a visible wall for all of the students to see.
(10 minutes)
  • Distribute a set blank index cards to each student. The number of index cards to distribute to each student will depend on the number of sight words introduced in this lesson -- students will need enough index cards to write one sight word per card.
  • Tell students to use the posted sight words to support them to write one sight word on each index card.
  • Give students time to practice reading through their index cards independently.
  • Pair each student up with a partner and have them take turns holding up their cards for their classmate to read. Encourage students to coach their partners if they struggle with reading a sight word.
  • Optional: Students can time one another and try to increase their speed with each round of reading the sight word index cards.
(20 minutes)
  • Hand out and preview the Make Your Own Sight Word Search worksheet and have students complete it independently. Ask students to trade word searches with a partner when they are done.

Support:

  • Shade columns or rows of the word search template so that the students are working with a smaller grid.

Enrichment:

  • Encourage students to look for word families within their sight words (e.g., could, would, should) and to incorporate these words from the same word families into their word searches to make them more challenging.
(10 minutes)
  • Divide your class into two groups.
  • Line up the groups in two lines.
  • Tell students that the only people who should be talking are the two students at the front of each line.
  • Hold up one sight word card for the students to read aloud.
  • The first person to read the card correctly wins the card for their team.
  • Repeat this activity until each student has had an opportunity to read a sight word card.
  • The group with the most cards at the end of the game wins.
(5 minutes)
  • Talk to students about the importance of being able to read sight words automatically without decoding. Discuss with them how reading sight words enables them to unlock meaning in texts and to read fluently.
  • Encourage students to search for these sight words as they are reading at school and at home. Discuss ways to record the sight words that they encounter during reading (e.g., class list that is posted on the wall that students add to each week).

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