January 15, 2018
|
by Jennifer Sobalvarro

Lesson plan

St. Valentine’s Conflicting Compare and Contrast

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Students will be able to compare and contrast the origin of Valentine’s Day and verbally recount a St. Valentine legend of their choice.

(5 minutes)
  • Distribute white boards and ask students to choose their favorite Avenger: Captain America or Iron Man. (Tip: If students are unfamiliar with these two characters, choose different characters or people to compare and contrast.)
  • Have students write their answers on their white boards and hold them up. (Tip: Write the names on the board for them to copy.)
  • Assign partners based on their Avenger choice and ask the pairs to write down the things they like about them.
  • Draw a Venn diagram on the board and label the same and differences section (see the Valentine History worksheet for an example).
  • Choose students to contribute comments regarding the details. (Tip: As they give their details, write them in the correct section on the Venn diagram, relaying your reasoning to your students.)
(10 minutes)
  • Review the learning objective and have students define St. Valentine (man rumored to have inspired Valentine’s Day), Valentine’s Day (February 14th holiday), compare (details that are the same), and contrast (details that are different).
  • Distribute Valentine History and read through the legends with the students.
  • Ask the students which they think is the truth and have them defend their answer. (Tip: As they give reasons, circle the details in the legends to use in the Venn diagram later. Allow them to modify their answer if they do not initially provide a detail from the legends.)
  • Read Legend #1 again and circle the details that you can add to the Venn diagram.
  • Write the 5 Ws (who, what, where, when, why) on the board and explain to students they can use the 5 Ws to assist in finding key details in the legend.
  • Think aloud about your thought process for choosing the details you circle. (For example, “I am going to circle Ancient Rome as a key detail because it’s telling me where the story took place.)
(8 minutes)
  • Read Legend #2 aloud and randomly choose students to identify one of the 5 Ws in a sentence and circle it until all key details are circled.
  • Model how to add the details from Legend #1 into the Venn diagram with student input.
  • Ask students which section you should place the details and have them write their answers on their white boards. (For instance, “Should I place Ancient Rome in the same or different section? Write your answer on your white board and hold it up for me to see.")
(7 minutes)
  • Explain that since you have shown them how to place Legend #1 details in the Venn diagram, they will need to place the details from Legend #2 that you’ve circled together in the proper section in the diagram.
  • Reiterate that they will only place the details you've already circled on the diagram.

Support:

  • Provide the sentence stems for sharing their reasoning. (For instance, “I believe Legend #____because____.”)
  • Challenge students to explain the connection between the St. Valentine legends and the Valentine’s Day holiday we currently celebrate with cards and candy.
  • Request they complete a Venn diagram on their white board comparing and contrasting one of the legends with the current Valentine’s Day.

Enrichment:

  • Challenge students to explain the connection between the St. Valentine legends and the Valentine’s Day holiday we currently celebrate with cards and candy.
  • Request they complete a Venn diagram on their white board comparing and contrasting one of the legends with the current Valentine’s Day.
(3 minutes)
  • Consider student's details from the Venn diagram as a formative assessment of their understanding for differentiating between similarities and differences, as well as how to complete a Venn diagram.
  • Ask students to answer on their white boards whether the detail “Avengers” is a similarity or difference for Captain America and Iron Man.
(2 minutes)
  • Say, “Now that we have reviewed the legends about St. Valentine thoroughly, I want you to tell me if you still believe one over the other. Write yes or no on your white boards.”
  • Request that your students turn and talk to their partners to give their reasoning.

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