October 2, 2017
|
by Mia Perez

Lesson plan

Syllabication: Open and Closed Syllables

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Students will be able to separate multisyllabic words into syllables and determine if those syllables are open or closed.

(5 minutes)
  • Tell students that there are six types of syllables, but today we will be focusing on open and closed syllables.
  • Explain that in order to determine if a syllable is open or closed, you need to look at the vowel.
  • Tell students that an open syllable occurs when a vowel is at the end of the syllable, which results in the long vowel sound as in “o/pen.” A closed syllable occurs when a syllable ends with a consonant, which results in a short vowel sound as in sit.
  • Summarize for students that in a closed syllable, the vowel is followed by a consonant and it is “closed in.” In an open syllable, nothing comes after the vowel. It is open since there is nothing closing it in.
(15 minutes)
  • Write the headings “Open Syllables” and “Closed Syllables” on the board.
  • Write the word over on the board.
  • Ask students to say the word aloud as a class and hold up their fingers to show how many syllables are in the word (two).
  • Ask for a student volunteer to come up to the board to separate the word, using a slash, into two syllables.
  • Support students to see that over would be separated as o/ver.
  • Asks students if this is an open or closed syllable and to explain why.
  • Write this word under the correct heading (“Open Syllables”).
  • Write the word number on the board.
  • Ask students to say the word aloud as a class and hold up their fingers to show how many syllables are in the word (two).
  • Ask for a student volunteer to come up to the board to separate the word, using a slash, into two syllables.
  • Support students to see that number would be separated as num/ber.
  • Ask students if this is an open or closed syllable and to explain why.
  • Write this word under the correct heading (“Closed Syllables”).
  • Continue this activity by asking students to brainstorm words containing open and closed syllables, dividing words and then sorting each word under the correct heading.
(15 minutes)
  • Distribute one word card to each student.
  • Ask students to read their words and decide where to separate the word by syllables.
  • Have students either cut the card or draw a line at the syllable juncture.
  • Have students come up to pocket chart, read their word aloud to the class, and place their separated word under “Open Syllables” or “Closed Syllables.”
  • Ask students to give a thumbs up if they agree and a thumbs down if they disagree with how their classmates separated and sorted their word cards.
(15 minutes)
  • Show students the Open and Closed Syllable Sort worksheet and have them complete it independently.

Support:

  • Pre-teach lessons on dividing syllables for students who are having difficulty with this concept (see optional worksheets).

Enrichment:

  • Challenge students to come up with a list of words that contain two or more syllables in which every syllable is closed (e.g., absent, fantastic).
  • Ask students to come up with a list of words that contain both open and closed syllables (e.g., apron, basic, began).
(5 minutes)
  • Distribute a whiteboard to each student.
  • Say a word aloud and ask students to write the word on their whiteboards.
  • Ask students to draw a slash to separate the syllables.
  • Have students to write “open” or “closed” under their word.
  • Tell students to hold up their whiteboards so you can assess if they are correctly separating their syllables and correctly identifying open vs. closed syllables.
  • Continue this activity with a variety of words containing open and closed syllables.
(5 minutes)
  • Have students think-pair-share the Three Ws.
  • Ask them to think about what (what they learned about today), so what (why it is useful), and now what? (how it fits into what they are learning and where they are going with our learning).
  • Ask students to share their ideas with a neighbor and then call on students to share their ideas with the class.
  • Support your students to understand that these two types of syllables will help them become better spellers and will help them if they encounter difficulty when decoding challenging words.

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