October 9, 2017
|
by Mia Perez

Lesson plan

What Were They Thinking?

(2 ratings )
Download lesson plan
Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Identifying the Author's Purpose pre-lesson.
EL Adjustments
Grade Subject View aligned standards

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

Which set of standards are you looking for?

Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Identifying the Author's Purpose pre-lesson.

Students will be able to explain the idea of an author’s purpose and analyze texts to determine whether they write to persuade, inform, or entertain the reader.

The adjustment to the whole group lesson is a modification to differentiate for children who are English learners.
EL adjustments
(5 minutes)
  • Tell students that today we are going to talk about authors and think about the author's purpose, which is the reason an author writes.
  • Ask students to brainstorm a list of things that authors create (e.g., newspaper articles, novels, comics, recipes, etc.). Write students' ideas on the chart paper.
  • Discuss with students why authors write these different pieces.
  • Support students to understand that authors write with a purpose to persuade, inform, or entertain the reader.
(10 minutes)
  • On a new piece of chart paper, write the headings "persuade," "entertain," and "inform" at the top.
  • Tell students that persuade means to try to get you to do something.
  • Tell students that inform means to give you information and facts.
  • Tell students that entertain means to amuse the reader and keep their attention.
  • Show students their brainstormed list of things authors create and have them sort this list based on the author's purpose. Encourage students to add more to the list.
  • Write students' ideas on the chart paper under each heading.
(15 minutes)
  • Tell students that when authors write, they are trying to get readers to feel a certain way. Thinking about how you feel after you read will help you determine the author's purpose for writing a text.
  • Show students an excerpt from Malala Yousafzai's autobiography I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban (see related media).
  • Read the excerpt aloud and and ask students to read along silently.
  • Ask students how they feel after reading this excerpt. Why did the author write this text? Would they classify the author's purpose as to persuade, inform, or entertain? What specific details in the text lead them to that conclusion?
  • Project an excerpt from Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth: The Crisis of Global Warming (see related media).
  • Read the excerpt aloud and and ask students to read along silently.
  • Ask students how they feel after reading this excerpt. Why did the author write this text? Would they classify the author's purpose as to persuade, inform, or entertain? What specific details in the text lead them to that conclusion?
  • Project an excerpt from David Shannon's No, David! (see related media).
  • Read the excerpt aloud and and ask students to read along silently.
  • Ask students how they feel after reading this excerpt. Why did the author write this text? Would they classify the author's purpose as to persuade, inform, or entertain? What specific details in the text lead them to that conclusion?
(15 minutes)
  • Project an excerpt from Michelle Obama's American Grown (see related media).
  • Read the excerpt aloud and and ask students to read along silently.
  • Tell students that it is their turn to determine an author's purpose independently.
  • Instruct students to write a response to this excerpt. Ask students to write about how they feel after reading this excerpt. Why did the author write this text? Would they classify the author's purpose as to persuade, inform, or entertain? What specific details in the text lead them to that conclusion?
  • Distribute the lined paper to each student.

Support:

  • For students who need extra scaffolding, sit with them to plan their writing and organize their thoughts by creating an outline or using a graphic organizer.
  • Give students who need extra support the opportunity to work with a partner on their writing.

Enrichment:

  • For students who need an extra challenge, have them produce an original piece of writing that either persuades, informs, or entertains the reader. Tell students to think about the details they observed in the text that enabled them to determine the author's purpose and use similar details in their writing.
  • For advanced students, have them produce two pieces of persuasive writing from two different viewpoints. (For example, persuading the reader to make recess longer and persuading the reader to make recess shorter.)
(10 minutes)
  • Call students to the rug.
  • Have students volunteer to pick a sentence strip and read the sentence aloud (e.g., "2.8 billion pounds of chocolate are consumed in America each year," "It is so important to incorporate exercise into your life now so you can grow up to be big and strong," "The superhero flew down and rescued the abandoned kitten").
  • Have the volunteer call on a classmate to identify the author's purpose for that sentence.
  • Ask students to agree or disagree with their classmate's answer by showing a thumbs up or a thumbs down.
  • Repeat this activity until all of the sentence strips have been read.
(5 minutes)
  • Review with students the idea that every time an author writes, they have a reason.
  • Explain to students that identifying why an author writes is important in helping the reader comprehend the text.
  • Call on students to select books from the classroom library.
  • Ask students to look at the type of book (e.g., picture book or an encyclopedia), see if they recognize the name of the author, and flip through the pages of the book to help them predict the author's purpose for writing that book.
  • Tell students in the audience to give a thumbs up or a thumbs down if they agree or disagree with their classmate's prediction.

Add to collection

Create new collection

Create new collection

New Collection>

0 items

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely

What could we do to improve Education.com?

Please note: Use the Contact Us link at the bottom of our website for account-specific questions or issues.

What would make you love Education.com?

What is your favorite part about Education.com?