August 9, 2015
|
by Rhondra Lewis

Lesson plan

What's a Metaphor?

(3 ratings )
Download lesson plan
EL Adjustments
Grade
Standards

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

No standards associated with this content.

Which set of standards are you looking for?

Students will understand the concept of a metaphor and be able to construct their own metaphors.

The adjustment to the whole group lesson is a modification to differentiate for children who are English learners.
EL adjustments
(5 minutes)
  • Poll the class using the following prompt: "What is a metaphor?"
  • Have students volunteer to share their thoughts.
  • Write a metaphor on the board like the following example: Your room is a disaster area.
  • Tell students that metaphors are analogies that compare two unlike things by saying they're the same.
  • Have students identify the two things being compared and explain how they are similar.
  • Explain to students that in this lesson they will identify metaphors, explain how they are similar, and use them in a sentence.
(10 minutes)
  • Write another example of a metaphor on the board like the following: My teacher is a dragon.
  • Have students identify the two things being compared and explain how they are similar.
  • Next, have students give you two nouns (like an animal and a person) and write them on the board.
  • Have students list their similarities or how they are alike and write the list on the board.
  • Then have students create an analogy or sentence that compares the two.
  • Tell students that they just created an analogy.
(10 minutes)
  • Have students work in pairs or small groups to complete the Metaphor worksheet.
  • Students will follow the directions on the sheet and work with one another to identify metaphors and their similarities.
(20 minutes)
  • Advise students they will work alone to complete this part of the lesson.
  • Using the Writing Metaphors worksheet, have students first think of the similarities between the two things that are listed.
  • Allow students to write these similarities on the left side or the back of each metaphor to guide their thinking.
  • Have students use their worksheets to create their own metaphors for the two things listed on each line.
  • Enrichment: Allow advanced students to create a list of metaphors they know. Have them identify the two objects being compared and how they are similar.
  • Support: Have struggling students complete the Metaphor Game with you or a partner.
  • Use the whiteboard to display examples and allow students to interact with it as they identify metaphors throughout the lesson.
  • Use Today’s Meet for introduction to lesson.
(10 minutes)
  • Using the Make an Animal Metaphor worksheet, have students create an animal metaphor.
  • Then, have students write sentences that complement their metaphors.
  • If time permits, allow them to turn their metaphors into poems.
(5 minutes)
  • Recap today's lesson.
  • Have students explain in their own words what they learned today.
  • Allow students to ask questions that they still have.

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely

What could we do to improve Education.com?

Please note: Use the Contact Us link at the bottom of our website for account-specific questions or issues.

What would make you love Education.com?

What is your favorite part about Education.com?