June 16, 2015
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by Sarah Marten

Lesson plan

You're On a Roll! Practicing Multiplication Facts

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Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Strategies to Make Multiplication a Breeze pre-lesson.
EL Adjustments
Grade Subject View aligned standards
Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Strategies to Make Multiplication a Breeze pre-lesson.
  • Students will be able to solve multiplication facts up to the number six.
The adjustment to the whole group lesson is a modification to differentiate for children who are English learners.
EL adjustments
(2 minutes)
  • Begin the lesson by asking students the answer to basic multiplication facts. Start with easy facts, and then work your way up to harder problems.
  • Ask students what strategies they use to memorize their times tables.
  • Explain that most math memorization happens best with lots of practice. Tell your class that today, you will be showing them a fun, hands-on way to practice multiplication facts up to the number six.
(10 minutes)
  • Grab a pair of dice and a printout of the Answer Mat to model the game for your students.
  • Show your class the pair of dice, and toss them. Tell them what numbers you rolled. For example, "I just rolled a four and a six."
  • Draw the number of dots you rolled on the board as a multiplication math sentence. For example, draw four dots, a multiplication sign, then six dots, and an equal sign.
  • Ask the students to solve your equation. For example, "What is 4 x 6 = ?"
  • Accept student answers, and provide feedback as necessary. Then, model rolling and setting up the problem again.
  • Show the students the answer mat. Find the squares with the answers to the two dice rolls (if applicable) and shade them in.
  • Tell the students they will be practicing their math facts by rolling the dice and shading in the answer on the mat. Students can only shade in a square if the product, or multiplication total, of the two dice equals a number on the mat. For example, if a student rolls a three and a five, they can only shade in 15 on their mat if it is a number in a square.
(15 minutes)
  • Choose a student volunteer to repeat the process with their own pair of dice and answer sheet.
  • Tell the class that they will be practicing their math facts by rolling the dice and shading in the answer on the mat.
  • Remind students that they can only shade in a square if the product of the two dice equals a number on the mat. For example, if a student rolls a three and a five, they can only shade in 15 on their mat if it is a number in a square.
(15 minutes)
  • If you'd like the class to work in partners, pair them off now. Otherwise, skip this step.
  • Pass out a pair of dice and an Answer Mat to each student, or pair of students, depending on how you've structured the activity.
  • Walk the room and monitor students to make sure they are practicing correctly.
  • Students will often roll the same two numbers more than once. Inform them they should keep rolling until they are able to shade in all spaces on the answer mat.
  • If students are working in pairs, encourage them to compete and see who can fill in the answer mat first. If you'd like, you can incentivize this game with a prize.
  • Enrichment: Have students who need more of a challenge work on the Multiplication Table worksheet. Encourage them to think about what strategies they can use to solve these problems.
  • Support: Students who need more support should be encouraged to draw out each roll of the dice. This way, they can visualize the answer to each multiplication problem more easily.
(8 minutes)
  • Have students take out whiteboards and whiteboard markers.
  • Call out a multiplication fact and have them record their answer on the whiteboard. Instruct them to display their answer to you and quickly check to see which students are correct.
  • Ask a nonvolunteer to explain why the answer is correct.
(5 minutes)
  • To conclude the lesson, remind students that multiplication facts are an essential math skill.
  • Ask students about this technique for memorizing math facts. Us questions such as:
    • What did they like about it?
    • Are there other techniques that your students like better?
  • Gather as many suggestions for memorizing math facts as you can. This will help inform what kinds of activities resonate with your class.

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