Relative Pronouns

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11 filtered results
Relative Pronouns
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Pronouns
Pronouns
Guided Lesson
Pronouns
Mastering pronouns enables students' writing to be more sophisticated. They are able to construct more complex sentences and express ideas more original ways. This short unit focuses on possessive, indefinite and reflexive pronouns, in addition to pronoun and antecedent agreement.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Guided Lesson
Pronoun Review: Possessive, Relative, and Indefinite
Pronoun Review: Possessive, Relative, and Indefinite
Worksheet
Pronoun Review: Possessive, Relative, and Indefinite
Students will review pronoun basics before going over three specific types of pronouns!
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
All Kinds of Pronouns: Practice
All Kinds of Pronouns: Practice
Worksheet
All Kinds of Pronouns: Practice
Identifying pronouns can help writers understand the way English words work together.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Relative Pronouns
Relative Pronouns
Exercise
Relative Pronouns
Relative pronouns make it simple for your fourth grader to describe the subject of a sentence in a fluid and orderly way. Give them the practice they need with these exercises and helpful hints.
4th grade
Reading & Writing
Exercise
It’s Grammar Time: Relative Pronouns (Who, Whose, Whom, That, Which)
It’s Grammar Time: Relative Pronouns (Who, Whose, Whom, That, Which)
Worksheet
It’s Grammar Time: Relative Pronouns (Who, Whose, Whom, That, Which)
Use this resource to support your students as they learn about the most common relative pronouns.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Varsity Pronoun Review
Varsity Pronoun Review
Lesson Plan
Varsity Pronoun Review
Once your students understand basic pronouns, introduce them to varsity level pronouns: definite and indefinite pronouns, possessive and relative pronouns, and pronoun and antecedent agreement.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Lesson Plan
It’s Grammar Time: Relative Pronouns (That, Which)
It’s Grammar Time: Relative Pronouns (That, Which)
Worksheet
It’s Grammar Time: Relative Pronouns (That, Which)
Use this resource to help your students learn that the job of a relative pronoun is to connect the noun to other parts of the sentence. Your students will practice choosing the best relative pronoun to complete a sentence.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Let’s Go Down to Pronoun Town
Let’s Go Down to Pronoun Town
Worksheet
Let’s Go Down to Pronoun Town
Assess students' understanding of pronouns with this comprehensive review.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
All Kinds of Pronouns: Introduction
All Kinds of Pronouns: Introduction
Worksheet
All Kinds of Pronouns: Introduction
Introduce how pronouns work and why they're so important with this informative worksheet.
5th grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
Who and Whom
Who and Whom
Worksheet
Who and Whom
Is it "who" or "whom"? With this practice sheet, your child will learn when to use each word, and she'll get to try using them in sentences.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet
It’s Grammar Time: Relative Pronouns (Who, Whom, Whose)
It’s Grammar Time: Relative Pronouns (Who, Whom, Whose)
Worksheet
It’s Grammar Time: Relative Pronouns (Who, Whom, Whose)
The job of a relative pronoun is to connect the noun to other parts of the sentence. Use this resource with your students to give them practice choosing the best relative pronoun to complete a sentence.
3rd grade
Reading & Writing
Worksheet

Relative Pronouns

Relative pronouns are important connectors in a sentence. A relative pronoun is part of a relative clause, which refers back to a noun that occurs previously in the sentence. Like reflexive pronouns, relative pronouns are considered anaphors, which means they are bound to and derive meaning from the word that occurs before them. Ample practice with Education.com exercises and worksheets will boost your students’ understanding of relative pronouns.

Getting Started With Relative Pronouns

Relative pronouns play an important connecting role in sentences. They connect a subordinate clause to the main clause. They can also merge two sentences.

Because the list is relatively short, students may find relative pronouns easy to approach:
  • Who
  • Whoever
  • Whom
  • Whomever
  • That
  • Which
  • When
  • Where
  • Whose
  • What
Note: Students may find whom and whomever awkward. These rarely occur in American English, and are much more often represented by who and whoever.

When connecting two clauses, the relative pronoun modifies a noun. In this case, ‘who’ is a relative pronoun:
  • Students who do their homework get higher grades.
‘Who’ referred to the students, indicating the ones who did homework were the ones to receive better overall scores.

Relative pronouns can also merge two short, but related sentences. In this example, ‘that’ is a relative pronoun:

The bus was yellow.
+
The bus went to the school.
=
The bus that was yellow went to the school.


In the example above, the two sentences both involved the noun ‘bus,’ but they were a little choppy when viewed together. By using a relative pronoun, the sentence structure is more fluid, while the meaning remains clear.

Students who practice multiple choice, fill in the blank exercises, like the one above, will soon understand how to properly employ relative pronouns. For more advanced study, quiz your students using the ‘Who’ versus ‘Whom’ worksheet, and they’ll soon be relative pronoun professionals.